“7 Ways To Transform Retail Store Displays Into Sales” by Bobb Phibbs via The Retail Doctor blog

“7 Ways To Transform Retail Store Displays Into Sales” by Bobb Phibbs via The Retail Doctor blog

There are a lot of ways your sales displays can be your silent salesperson. The trick is to make sure your displays include some of the basics. Try these seven ways to make your retail store displays do more than just look attractive. 1. Change your displays monthly You’ve got to keep your customers guessing – a little, anyway. Every couple of weeks move the sales displays around to keep them from getting stale – and certainly move them when new merchandise comes in. Since the fairly new products will still be selling, switch your displays two weeks after their arrival. Move one display from the front to the middle of the store and another display from the middle to the back. Discover: How to craft a retail merchandising plan with this comprehensive primer 2. Try a little tenderness In merchandising, as in life, the best things are things you want, not what you need. So give your customer that as well. Put the fanciest, newest, most expensive, dream-worthy items in the most prominent place in your store. Be sure to have several levels of height and enough products so that the customer can pick up and touch these desired items without having to totally dismantle your beautiful display. 3. Never, never, never, EVER build a monochromatic display Generally speaking, group items by product use or two or three colors – you’re looking for the one thing that makes it a group. Unless you run a grocery store, your grouping shouldn’t be entirely made up of one product. That’s warehousing, not merchandising. You can create a sales display by product...
“Building Lasting Customer Loyalty Amid Inflation” by Matt Ramerman via Total Retail

“Building Lasting Customer Loyalty Amid Inflation” by Matt Ramerman via Total Retail

The COVID-19 pandemic plus the war in Ukraine created a perfect storm for inflation, and now the prices of goods and services are dominating the minds of consumers everywhere. Annual inflation rose by 8.3 percent in April, close to a 40-year high, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. Everything from food and gas to travel and housing is more expensive, which has many consumers watching their wallets and shopping around for the best prices. With many concerned about rising inflation, we can expect once-loyal customers to switch brands if it means cheaper prices. The stakes have never been higher: in addition to inflation challenges, 87 percent of consumers across all generations avoid buying from brands they don’t trust (especially boomers). Now more than ever, you need to understand what your customers are facing and ensure they both trust your brand and feel supported. Since people are increasingly using their mobile devices to shop, this means your brand must be present where your customers are, regardless of time, location or channel (e.g., SMS, Facebook Messenger, Instagram, etc.). Related story: AI in the DMs: Seizing the Social Commerce Opportunity With Conversational Messaging The Secret to Communicating With Customers: Have Open Dialogs As consumers keep a close eye on prices, ensuring they’re able to converse with your brand is key. Now is not the time to be using high-pressure, high-frequency one-way campaigns focused on driving conversions. Remember, since they’re ready, and willing, to experiment with new brands, your communications strategy with your customers needs to focus on inviting a relationship as means to build loyalty. Implementing a conversational marketing strategy not only allows you to have...
“BC Owner on Snow Season, Sales Trends and Inventory” by Tiffany Montgomery via Shop Eat Surf (Executive Edition)

“BC Owner on Snow Season, Sales Trends and Inventory” by Tiffany Montgomery via Shop Eat Surf (Executive Edition)

BC Surf & Sport in Lone Tree, Colorado – Photo by SES Company Owner {and BRA Board Member} Bruce Cromartie answered some questions for us about how the snow season turned out, including what brands sold well. We also asked him about current sales trends and concerns about the potential for inventory buildup in the market. Please note that this article is a Shop Eat Surf Executive Edition article so you will need to sign up for access before viewing: Click here to login or click here to sign up for a free 30 day Executive Edition trial. We, at BRA,  feel that the benefits of the SES Executive Edition Membership outweigh the cost. Be sure to visit the Shop Eat Surf website to view valuable Industry News and Resourceful Articles regularly via this link: Shop Eat Surf If you are not yet a BRA Retail Member, you can easily opt in to either Regular (no cost) or Distinguished ($100/yr.) Membership via this super simple join...
“16 THINGS YOU DIDN’T KNOW ABOUT TRUCKS” by Christian Senrud via JENKEM MAG

“16 THINGS YOU DIDN’T KNOW ABOUT TRUCKS” by Christian Senrud via JENKEM MAG

For as long as I have been skateboarding, there have been so many debates over which trucks turn the fastest, which trucks grind the best, and which trucks last the longest. Each brand has their own specialty, and there’s no telling which trucks are truly “the best,” (although there are some that can be definitely be considered the worst). To get more familiar with the history and intricacies of these old metal contraptions, we put together a list of truck facts that you may not have known or even cared to think about. Hopefully, something is useful here, or at the very least, will help you the next time you play skate trivia. 1. THE SHOP THAT SOLD THE FIRST PAIRS OF TRUCKS IS STILL IN BUSINESS In 1962 Val Surf in Los Angeles was the first shop to sell trucks with the intent to use them on a skateboard. Ordering trucks and wheels from a roller skate company, they would put together DIY boards with help from students at the local high school. 2. THE RIVALRY BETWEEN THRASHER AND TRANSWORLD IS BASED ON TRUCKS In 1981, Fausto Vitello, one of the owners of Independent Trucks, founded Thrasher Magazine as a way to promote Independent and other brands. Two years later, Larry Balma, owner of Tracker Trucks, followed suit and launched Transworld Magazine. The two magazines had different views on skating, (“Skate and Destroy” [Thrasher] vs. “Skate and Create” [Transworld]) but were both created to promote their respective truck companies. 3. THE WORD “TRUCK” DATES BACK 1800 YEARS Short for “truckle,” which is a “small wheel or roller,” the word truck is derived from the Latin...
“Retail Moves From ‘The Great Acceleration’ To ‘The Great Rebalancing’.” by Steve Dennis via Forbes

“Retail Moves From ‘The Great Acceleration’ To ‘The Great Rebalancing’.” by Steve Dennis via Forbes

A Best Buy store, a retailer of consumer electronics, operating in the U.S., Canada and Mexico.GETTY During the early part of the pandemic, it became popular to say that we had experienced 10 years of e-commerce growth in only 10 weeks. While that was rather obviously not close to being true, the idea of a “great acceleration” in just about all things retail made its way into the popular vernacular. Moreover, many media outlets and retail pundits declared that some trends—most notably grocery home delivery—were permanent sea changes. As it turns out, not so much. While it’s clear that some important shifts did occur during the Covid crisis, it’s also quite apparent that right now we are experiencing much more of a “great rebalancing” and a rather clear return to more familiar shopping patterns. As revealed in the today’s US Census Bureau monthly sales data report, spending in the areas with the greatest activity spikes over the past two years are almost all decelerating significantly, and the most pronounced spending shifts of the recent past are seeing a reversion closer to the mean. For example, big ticket purchases and fitness equipment outlays that had been way up, are now seeing year over year declines. Apparel and restaurant spending, which had been hard hit during the depths of Covid, are both now registering solid gains. The rate of increase in eating out now greatly exceeds food purchases for the home, bringing us closer to the pre-Covid relative share of spending. As more data comes in, the supposed massive acceleration of online shopping is now turning out to be closer to one or...
“5 Ways To Ace A Quick Store Refresh Of Your Retail Merchandising” by Bob Phibbs via Retail Doctor Blog

“5 Ways To Ace A Quick Store Refresh Of Your Retail Merchandising” by Bob Phibbs via Retail Doctor Blog

When I lived in Los Angeles, I did business makeovers for the Los Angeles Times. Now that I speak and travel more, I only do business makeovers as a paid consultant.  Recently I was contacted by a spa and outdoor furniture retailer for help with a storewide refresh focusing on their Retail Merchandising. I’m sharing five tips any retailer can use to help refresh your store. Of course, if you’re looking for my personal help, you can contact me here. When I approached the store I was taken by how much Big Green charcoal was piled in the windows and throughout the store. There was no focal point so upon entering, your eyes would be drawn to the cabinet lights on the mezzanine. One of the traffic draws at the location is free water testing on the mezzanine. How to interrupt shoppers to see all we had? How to focus their attention down and not up? How to draw customers’ eyes to the other parts of the large store? And finally, how to help people clearly see their complete product offering? I can’t go into all we did but these are some clues to follow for your own store reset. You can see my live video of the start here and the conclusion 9 hours later here. These are not the ultimate final pictures as they were in the process of setting up a whole new outdoor kitchen area and we had a lot to clean up, but you’ll get the idea. How to Remerchandise Your Store Color leads the way. One of the things outdoor furniture stores have that most others don’t are umbrellas....