“REDEFINING BLATANT LOCALISM – Elon Buying Twitter Got Me Thinking” by Anthony Pappalardo via Artless Industria

“REDEFINING BLATANT LOCALISM – Elon Buying Twitter Got Me Thinking” by Anthony Pappalardo via Artless Industria

PHOTO: Yes, that’s a Space X Skateboard. As you probably know, Elon Musk and a group of investors bought Twitter to make it a “town square that promotes free speech,” or something. As most people who cover tech or even own stock know, Twitter’s business plan sucks because it doesn’t make money. If you were to ask me who actually used Twitter, I’d break it into the following categories: Media folks Comedians Media people trying to be Comedians Comedians trying to be Media people A bunch of people into sports, art, and things trying to own each other. Some people who just read shit. Oh, and there are some skaters on #skatetwitter, mostly discussing pants or videos and sometimes the pants in videos, and other shit dealing with skateboarding in a mostly positive manner until we disagree and talk some light shit. While #skatetwitter exists, skateboarding mostly lives and thrives on Instagram and YouTube so with many threatening to leave Twitter due to Musk’s acquisition of it, this mostly means nothing in the skate world. Of course, YouTube and Instagram are fucked up but no one is leaving that space because it’s how we connect, find out about things, buy things, and look at things. That’s vital! Who cares who owns Instagram or any platform? Skateboarding needs Instagram! And YouTube! What would happen if they went bankrupt and all that content disappeared? How would skateboarding survive? Well, if Meta pulled the plug on IG and Facebook, it certainly would impact the bottom lines of many companies but the smart ones that capture your data willingly would have deep databases and you’d continue to know what drops...
“New Tactics CEO on Business Trends and More” plus link to 30 day free trial by Tiffany Montgomery via Shop Eat Surf (Executive Edition)

“New Tactics CEO on Business Trends and More” plus link to 30 day free trial by Tiffany Montgomery via Shop Eat Surf (Executive Edition)

New Tactics CEO Dugan Baker – Photo courtesy of Tactics By Tiffany Montgomery | Published Apr 26, 2022 Important industry skate and snow retailer Tactics (BRA Distinguished Retail Member), which is a big online player in addition to operating three brick-and-mortar stores, has a new CEO. Please note that this article is a Shop Eat Surf Executive Edition article so you will need to sign up for access before viewing: Click here to login or click here to sign up for a free 30 day Executive Edition trial. We, at BRA,  feel that the benefits of the SES Executive Edition Membership outweigh the cost. Be sure to visit the Shop Eat Surf website to view valuable Industry News and Resourceful Articles regularly via this link: Shop Eat Surf If you are not yet a BRA Retail Member, you can easily opt in to either Regular (no cost) or Distinguished ($100/yr.) Membership via this super simple join...
“2022 Trends For Social Commerce” by Mark Hook via Independent Retailer

“2022 Trends For Social Commerce” by Mark Hook via Independent Retailer

Over the last 20 years, we have seen social media shift from simple, text-based updates to increasingly visual content, championed by app-based platforms like Instagram and Snapchat. Now, new entrants such as TikTok and Pinterest are taking the trend even further. Social media now goes way beyond communicating with friends and family. The impact and growth of social media brands play a huge part in what we see on our newsfeeds — and with that, social commerce has flourished. Social apps that already allow for commerce include Instagram, Facebook, and Pinterest, but TikTok and Twitter are also experimenting with shopping features. Social Commerce – Why You Should Care Social commerce is a $89 billion market right now, and is projected to grow to $605 billion in the next seven years. eMarketer predicts social commerce will rise by 35 percent to $36.09 billion in 2021 alone. Social is becoming a primary research tool for shoppers with many channels, including Instagram, acting as discovery engines for brands. According to Instagram, 60 percent of consumers discover new products on their platform, and users say that when they were inspired by something they saw, they would take steps to find and buy it straight away. Consumers also love the ability to browse and buy products within different digital environments, often as their preferred buying channel. In fact, 81 percent of shoppers research products on Instagram and Facebook, and shopping is a top priority for 48 percent of Pinterest users. Ignored Channels However, a staggering number of retailers are overlooking social media for commerce. According to Brightpearl’s own data of 4,000 shoppers, a quarter of retailers still do not have options for shoppers to buy via social channels, including some of the...
“Here’s Why ‘Kook Shaming’ Is Ridiculous” by Will Sileo via The Inertia

“Here’s Why ‘Kook Shaming’ Is Ridiculous” by Will Sileo via The Inertia

In my opinion, the best kind of comedy is the kind which picks out something that’s absolutely absurd in the world around us and highlights it. Bonus points if it’s something that we do on a daily basis and just didn’t realize how absurd it is. Enter kook shaming. Strange, isn’t it, how we as surfers love nothing better than to shit on other, less-experienced surfers than ourselves? Much like the middle-school playground, it can seem like the only way to get closer to the top is to push others down. “How dare he come down here and disrespect us by doing the things we do every day wrong,” says Luke Cederman of the Raglan Surf Report. “I’ll film him and then we’ll put it on the internet so everyone can see him.” While the video itself is indeed hilarious, it is, or perhaps should be, a bit thought-provoking as well. Is this really how we treat newcomers to our sport? In general, yes. Can we do better? Also yes. Be sure to visit The Inertia website to view valuable Surfing related News and Resourceful Articles regularly. Speaking of helpful articles from the good people behind The Inertia, you may want to click on the following link to learn about how BRA Supporting Vendor Partner SurfCare can help you generate additional revenue from Surfboard Sales without increasing inventory: https://www.boardretailers.org/you-might-not-need-to-worry-about-breaking-a-brand-new-surfboard-ever-again-via-the-inertia/ If you are not yet a BRA Retail Member, you can easily opt in to either Regular (no cost) or Distinguished ($100/yr.) Membership via this super simple join...
“Schnauzer Breaks Silence on Torturous Dog Surfing Routine” by Johnny Utah via The Inertia

“Schnauzer Breaks Silence on Torturous Dog Surfing Routine” by Johnny Utah via The Inertia

A Schnauzer has broken his silence about how some dogs really feel about dog surfing events. Photo: Screenshot/Searle On a recent, sunny California day, a pack of dogs roamed the beach. The waves were up, and there were surfers in the water. But these weren’t ordinary surfers — they were dogs. Their owners laughed and smiled outside the waves, their teeth flashing in the sun, high-fiving when they pushed their four-legged friend into a wave. All looked well and good. Well and good, that is, until one dog chose to speak up. “This isn’t what it looks like,” he told me, his tail tucked between his legs in a classic indicator of fear. “They’re forcing us to do this. Honestly, we’re all terrified. We don’t understand what joy they can possibly get from doing this to us.” The dog — I’ll call him Spot, as he asked to remain anonymous — is a Schnauzer mix. He’s a good swimmer who enjoys swimming after sticks on occasion, but surfing, he told me, is not what he, or most other dogs, for that matter, is meant to be doing. “I mean, yeah, some of us like swimming, but you don’t understand how terrifying this is for us,” he said, staring mournfully out at the beach. His owner, a blond woman in khaki shorts and a flower print blouse, was frantically running up and down the beach, shouting his name. It was his turn to surf in a dog surfing contest, and she needed to put his lifejacket on him. “Just the fact that they’re putting us in lifejackets should tell you something,” Spot said. “Like, if you’re...
“The Undeniable Influence and Purchasing Power of Gen Z – How TikTok dances and streetwear drops are reshaping retailer strategies” by Adrien Nussenbaum via Total Retail

“The Undeniable Influence and Purchasing Power of Gen Z – How TikTok dances and streetwear drops are reshaping retailer strategies” by Adrien Nussenbaum via Total Retail

Credit: Getty Images by Franek Strzeszewski When we look back on trends from the 2010s, beyond planking and the Harlem Shake, one of the most pervasive fads was a certain type of thinkpiece: Millennials Are Killing Doorbells by Texting Instead. Millennials Are Killing Cereal. Can Boomers and Gen Z Save It? Even paper products couldn’t be spared: Millennials are killing the napkin industry. For years, these murderous, anti-capitalist millennials were lambasted for their role in bringing down some of our most important consumer products. But as millennials begin to age out of the coveted 18–49 shopping demographic, we’re seeing less reference to their role as an economic killer. Instead, Gen Z is coming under scrutiny for their unique consumer behaviors. Like millennials before them, Gen Z has become the subject of a number of opinion pieces in which industry analysts complain about their lack of loyalty and obsession with value. “They don’t want to pay full price for anything,” comments a consultant in this Business Insider piece on Gen Z shopping habits. In the same article, an executive director at Ernst & Young laments, “there really isn’t loyalty like in the past.” Gen Z’s spending power is on the rise. According to a recent Bloomberg report, the young students and professionals now command $360 billion in disposable income. As that figure increases, retailers cannot afford to keep making the same mistake. With each new generation, retailers will have two choices: they can blame them for their new shopping preferences, or they can adapt to the new state of play, making adjustments to their strategy to capture the interest and buying power of each...