“Skateparks Filled With Sand, So What, Shut Up And Skate – Venice and San Clemente skateparks get filled in with sand, here’s why it’s okay” by Jaime Owens via Transworld Skateboarding

“Skateparks Filled With Sand, So What, Shut Up And Skate – Venice and San Clemente skateparks get filled in with sand, here’s why it’s okay” by Jaime Owens via Transworld Skateboarding

When videos of the San Clemente and Venice, CA skateparks getting filled with sand went viral last week, many in the skateboarding population and beyond had real negative reactions – the outrage was fast, extreme, and polarizing. There was a lot of online screaming about personal freedom being take away. There was even a line of screaming about sand damaging the parks. The parks. Which are made of concrete. Being damaged by sand. For those of you who were up in arms about this, I’m here to tell you: everything’s gonna be fine, just fine. The parks were filled in because skaters weren’t obeying local ordinances mandating social distancing or respecting the clearly posted “No Trespassing” signs. Was it an extreme measure? Yes. Was it warranted? Probably, because what skater do you know who respects “No Trespassing” signs? I surely have skated right past my fair share or thousands. Having your local skatepark filled with sand is a bummer, I feel you, particularly when you have no clue when it’s going to get cleaned out. But the moral of the story is,  I don’t really give a shit and neither should you. San Clemente is my local park, and I want to skate it as badly as all the skaters who freaked out about the sand, but it’s still there. They didn’t bulldoze the damn thing, and one of these days it’ll be skateable again (no, Johnny, sand can’t hurt the concrete). But, more importantly, when did we let our skateboarding get regulated by whether some skatepark is open or not? There’s so much other shit to go skate, and...
“See Which States Are Reopening and Which Are Still Shut Down” By Sarah Mervosh, Jasmine C. Lee, Lazaro Gamio and Nadja Popovich via The New York Times

“See Which States Are Reopening and Which Are Still Shut Down” By Sarah Mervosh, Jasmine C. Lee, Lazaro Gamio and Nadja Popovich via The New York Times

After weeks of shutdown because of the coronavirus pandemic, the nation is beginning to slowly open up. Beaches and state parks are reopening to visitors, spurring concerns about overcrowding. The first barbers have returned to work, masks over their faces. Even some restaurants are getting ready to serve customers again. The reopenings — which in some cases have gone against the advice of public health experts — are happening piecemeal even as the number of new cases increases or remains steady across many states, leading to both pushback and confusion. The New York Times is tracking when orders to stay at home are lifted in each state, as well as when broad reopenings are allowed in public spaces, such as restaurants, retail stores, salons, gyms and houses of worship. In some cases, stay-at-home orders are lifting separately from restrictions on businesses. This page will be updated regularly. To view this entire article and the interactive map (both updated regularly), click on: NY Times States Reopen...
“Core Retailer Survey on Ability to Survive Crisis” provided by Action Watch (BRA Supporting Vendor Partner)

“Core Retailer Survey on Ability to Survive Crisis” provided by Action Watch (BRA Supporting Vendor Partner)

Thanks to Action Watch for supporting BRA as a Supporting Vendor Partner and for providing the following intel directly to our organization. Thanks again to Action Watch for supporting BRA as Supporting Vendor Partner and for providing this intel directly to our organization. As a reminder, BRA Distinguished Retail Members benefit from our relationship with Action Watch by receiving quarterly reports upon request. The data in the reports are from the ActionWatch Retail Panel, which is made up of over 250 U.S. surf and skate retail stores.  These are made available to you as a benefit to BRA Distinguished Retail members so that you can compare your store against other similar stores (shop names and other confidential info is not shown). If you are a BRA Regular Retailer and would like to receive links to quarterly Action Watch Data reports as well as a number of additional special offerings and discounts by upgrading your Membership to Distinguished, simply email doug@boardretailers.org and he will email you an invoice for the $99.00 Annual Membership Fee. If you are not yet a BRA Retail Member, you can opt in to either Regular (no cost) or Distinguished ($99/yr.) Membership via the link to the super simple join...
“Jeff Kearl on How Pandemic May Change Industry Going Forward” via Shop Eat Surf (Executive Edition)

“Jeff Kearl on How Pandemic May Change Industry Going Forward” via Shop Eat Surf (Executive Edition)

Please click on the following link to view this excellent Shop Eat Surf Article:  Jeff Kearl On How Pandemic May Change Industry Going Forward Please note that this particular article is a Shop Eat Surf Executive Edition article so you will need to sign up and pay for access before viewing. We, at BRA,  feel that the benefits of the SES Executive Edition Membership clearly outweigh the cost. Be sure to visit the Shop Eat Surf website to view valuable Industry News and Resourceful Articles regularly via this link: Shop Eat...
“Businesses Look to Government Lifelines in Order to Survive” by Andrew Asch via Apparel News

“Businesses Look to Government Lifelines in Order to Survive” by Andrew Asch via Apparel News

Like thousands of other businesses, Pocket Square Clothing, a maker of suiting accessories and bespoke clothing, had to furlough its staff because of the COVID-19 crisis. PSC co-founders Rodolfo Ramirez and Andrew Cheung saw their business come to a sudden halt just one year after they had acquired a 10-person sewing shop, Top Hand MFG, near the University of Southern California. But a few days later the city allowed PSC to reopen and the clothing company was able to bring its staff back. The local government had found a quick resolution to some of the company’s problems. The City of Los Angeles deemed PSC an essential business after it signed up for L.A. Protects, an initiative to mobilize Los Angeles apparel businesses to make face masks and personal protective equipment. PSC received no funding from the city; however, the city provided a database where companies needing face masks could contact manufacturers making the protective equipment, Ramirez said Getting involved with the L.A. Protects program meant that they had to rearrange the factory’s layout and bring it to the social-distancing specifications required by the Centers for Disease Control. Ramirez and Cheung are also working more than 12-hour days sourcing fabrics and materials to make face masks, Cheung said, “You have to start from scratch, and everyone is looking for the same thing you are,” he said of his new responsibilities. PSC is one of the few companies that has avoided a shutdown during the current crisis. Many shuttered companies had to suffer through massive furloughs and layoffs. Many of them don’t see quick fixes ahead, despite federal, state and local governments offering loans and stimulus...
“Coastal Breeze Can Carry COVID-19 More Than 6 Feet, Says Virus Expert – IN CASE YOU NEEDED ONE MORE REASON TO STAY AWAY FROM THE BEACH” by Todd Prodanovich via Surfer Mag

“Coastal Breeze Can Carry COVID-19 More Than 6 Feet, Says Virus Expert – IN CASE YOU NEEDED ONE MORE REASON TO STAY AWAY FROM THE BEACH” by Todd Prodanovich via Surfer Mag

Photo Credit: Grant EllisA perfect example of what not to do. Malibu crowds, sometime before the COVID-19 pandemic. Between stay-at-home orders, threats of fines for surfing and the off chance of getting shot at (if you happen to live in Costa Rica), there are plenty of reasons to steer clear of the beach right now. But if the sum total of those is somehow still not enough to keep you from paddling out, consider this: coastal breezes don’t care about our social distancing protocols and can carry the COVID-19 virus distances greater than 6 feet. That’s right, according to UC San Diego atmospheric scientist Kim Prather, who studies how viruses and bacteria can be transmitted in the ocean, your 6-foot safety bubble is burst when you enter a breezy environment, as the ocean and beaches frequently are. “Surfers are saying that they’re safe if they stay 6 feet away from other people, but that’s only true if the air isn’t moving,” Prather told the San Diego Union-Tribune. “Most of the time, there’s wind or a breeze at the coast. Tiny drops of virus can float in the air and get blown around.” In the UT article, Prather compares the way virus-carrying droplets travel in the breeze to the way cigarette smoke travels downwind. While you’re not gonna smell someone’s ciggy from very far away when the air is still, you can pick it up from a good distance with the wind. So what would be considered safe social distancing amid an ocean breeze? Pretend you’re standing 6 feet away from someone at the beach. OK, now back up. Keep going back. A...