“View the most recent BRA X M1 quarterly webinar about e-commerce featuring George right here.  You can also view the previous quarterly webinar about staffing plus all four 2021 BRA quarterly webinars here on demand at no cost” via BRA and Management One

“View the most recent BRA X M1 quarterly webinar about e-commerce featuring George right here. You can also view the previous quarterly webinar about staffing plus all four 2021 BRA quarterly webinars here on demand at no cost” via BRA and Management One

Once per Quarter, Board Retailers Association hosts relevant and helpful webinars on a variety of topics in collaboration with BRA Supporting Vendor Partner Management One. You can view the 2nd Quarter 2022 webinar as well as the 1st Quarter 2022 webinar and all four of the excellent 2021 collaborative quarterly webinars below (scroll down). Description of The 2nd Quarter 2022 Webinar: If the pandemic taught us anything, it’s that retailers who stayed ahead of the curve survived and thrived after the shutdown. Every business has unique internal and external factors that affect its ability to pivot and adapt to the evolving retail landscape, but it is critical to remain open to progression. View our live panel discussion with Nico and Dane of Management One, Dan of Retail smart Guys and George (our very own Chairman of the Board Retailers Association) on June 16th as we break down the strategies that are helping retailers achieve success in 2022 and beyond. Learn how independent retailers are strengthening their e-commerce, digital, and analytics strategies to maintain growth and overcome a changing economic landscape. Presented by Management One and Board Retailers Association Push play to view this informative and fun 2nd Quarter 2022 collaborative BRA + M1 webinar featuring BRA Chairman and Owner of Modern Skate & Surf, George Leichtweis, as well as BRA Supporting Vendor Partners Dan Jablons of Retail Smart Guys and Dane Cohen & Nico Cabral of Management One, We have embedded the recordings of the 1st Quarter 2022 webinar as well as all four of the excellent 2021 collaborative quarterly webinars below for your convenience. “Talent Acquisition: Building a Team Structured...
“7 Best Selling Techniques to Increase Your Sales” by Bob Phibbs via The Retail Doctor Blog

“7 Best Selling Techniques to Increase Your Sales” by Bob Phibbs via The Retail Doctor Blog

Looking for effortless retail sales training that can transform your staff? Are you willing to do the hard work to achieve it? Sorry, it’s not easy to transform your staff into selling powerhouses. Oh sure, you’ve probably heard it said of someone, “They could sell ice to an Eskimo,” or something similar to that. But how did they get that way? Is the ability to excel at retail selling an easy instinctive talent that can’t be learned? Not at all. Anyone can learn the best sales techniques in retail. If you want to hit the target, you just have to be more human… Here are the best selling techniques in retail 1. Sell people on benefits The “selling ice to an Eskimo” comment may be intended as a compliment of someone’s selling ability, but in truth, it highlights what a salesperson shouldn’t do. Selling products or services that aren’t genuinely useful, enjoyable, or in some other way beneficial to a customer, may help a salesperson’s short-term retail sales numbers. However, in the long run, you can’t be a great salesperson if you don’t consistently provide value to your customers. Selling things to customers that they’ll later regret buying will result in them never returning again and likely spreading negative impressions of your brand across Facebook and Twitter. The best salespeople not only understand this principle, but they also put it to work for them when they are selling. They make it clear to the customer how an item will benefit them, and then they repeat what the customer will get from buying the product throughout the selling process. 2. Be honest Never overstate the...
“HR In Retail: 5 Ways To Retain, Attract, And Keep Employees Happy” by Adam Hill via Retail Minded

“HR In Retail: 5 Ways To Retain, Attract, And Keep Employees Happy” by Adam Hill via Retail Minded

The retail sector struggles to maintain a stable and content workforce. It has one of the highest turnover rates averaging above 60%. Most employees work long hours with low wages and no benefits. The great resignation brought about by the Covid-19 made things worse because the retail sector suffered the second-highest number of resignees.  However, most retail companies are now on the road to recovery. This crisis was also a chance for retailers to develop their online sales channels and reinvent their strategies. Here are five tips to attract, retain and keep your retail employees. Prioritize Work-Family Balance Whilst long working hours seem to be the standard, flexible working hours will allow for some sort of work-life balance. Balance takes planning ahead, good coordination, and organization. One way to achieve this is through shift scheduling in advance and allowing employees to trade in shifts.  When you offer retail employees the power to choose their own shifts, their satisfaction increases. They will likely remain in the company for a longer time. Women make up the majority of the workforce in retail – company benefits like paid time afford working moms the opportunity to be with their families without worrying about finances. Through company support, work-family conflict can be greatly reduced. Encourage Career Growth Employees value companies with development opportunities and clear, defined career paths. Companies that take a blind eye to the employees’ quest for growth risk losing high-performing individuals.  To support the career progression of retail workers, companies must offer professional training and development opportunities that can help them to expand their skills and further their experience in the company.  To entice long-term stay in retail...
“Most Product Purchases Aren’t Impulsive, So Why Sell Them That Way?” by Bob Phibbs via The Retail Doctor Blog

“Most Product Purchases Aren’t Impulsive, So Why Sell Them That Way?” by Bob Phibbs via The Retail Doctor Blog

I walked into a store in California last year and they had what seemed like thousands of mason jar candles stacked on a glass fixture from the ’80s.It was right next to the register.I could see the logic of putting the display there. Candles are an impulse item. We probably don’t have to talk much about them. They could be a grab-and-go and increase sales.The flaw in this thinking was the price point. These were $24.95.That is not an impulse item.Even though it is a small product, the price point made it a considered purchase and demonstrated what I want to draw a distinction for you about today in this post.A considered purchase is one that makes the customer stop and ask themself questions: Is this a good value?Do I really need this?How does it work?What happens if I get it home and it isn’t right?Will this last? Obvious examples of considered purchases are flooring, automobiles, window fashions, and furniture – these are all large purchases that people have to think about not only before going to the store but also incorporated with new information they will receive in the store before they buy.So, what made these candles a considered purchase?Right off the casual glance, the merchandising said commodity. Once you saw the price tag, you had questions. What is the scent? What are they made of? What am I getting for $25? What are the differences between these items?A customer who has questions arise in their mind doesn’t buy…they move on. This is why there were so many candles left sitting on the shelf.Now if those candles had a sign that...
“Retail’s Bench Strength Is Dwindling, Here’s How To Build It Back” by Bob Phibbs via The Retail Doctor Blog

“Retail’s Bench Strength Is Dwindling, Here’s How To Build It Back” by Bob Phibbs via The Retail Doctor Blog

Retailers are getting shoppers back in droves. That’s great news. For the most recent period, while online retail sales fell for the third straight month, visits to stores were up. In fact, NRF’s annual forecast predicts that retail sales for 2022 will increase between 6 percent and 8 percent to between $4.86 trillion and $4.95 trillion. The bad news is many retailers are still understaffed and bench positions of leads and assistants are going unfilled. The high labor demand is pushing employers to pay higher wages as they compete to attract talent, and that higher pay is luring workers away from their current jobs. That in turn is leading managers to expect even more from even fewer workers. No wonder the Labor Department’s April Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey, or JOLTS report, recently showed a record 4.5 million people voluntarily quit their jobs. But on my calls with retailers, I’ve found what is hidden from the news is the weakening of the support systems at the core of many retail operations; their very infrastructure. What is infrastructure at the store level? It is the system of leadership within a store’s four walls. It is the underlying foundation that allows a brand to exceed shoppers’ expectations. As a component of physical infrastructure is a bridge between two landmasses, so do store leads and assistant managers function as a bridge between management and floor associates. What is infrastructure failure in retail? Retail infrastructure failure is the interruption of the leadership systems that provide for onboarding, training, accountability, etc. It is the leadership vacuum that allows bad customer service, missed sales targets, and increased shrink. What...
“Shoppers decide what makes a great in-store experience and here’s what they want” by Bobby Marhamat via Retail Customer Experience .com

“Shoppers decide what makes a great in-store experience and here’s what they want” by Bobby Marhamat via Retail Customer Experience .com

Photo by istock.com What, exactly, do today’s shoppers want from an in-store experience? The answer is clearer than you might think. When it comes to retail, beauty is in the eye of the consumer. Shoppers ultimately dictate which retailers are hip and profitable, and which decay into costly dinosaurs. As a retailer, you must discern between fads and sustainable trends to remain relevant. Probing consumers about their likes and dislikes is the only way to do this with consistency. And yet, revenue sheets and voluntary customer surveys only tell you so much. Each year, we aim to lend brick-and-mortar practitioners a helping hand with our State of Consumer Behavior 2022 report, which provides direct insights into customers’ prevailing likes, dislikes, and motivations. Without fail, these consumers tell us that the in-store experience has massive influence over where they choose to shop — with each report, though, we find new actionable discoveries that those in brick and mortar can use. The shopper of 2022 still values retail’s greatest hits, like value, excitement, and convenience. However, these shoppers are hungrier for experiential retail than they’ve ever been, with 77% of respondents calling in-store experiences “important” or “very important” to their shopping decisions. The pressing question for retailers is this: What, exactly, do today’s shoppers want from an in-store experience? The answer is clearer than you might think. Shoppers want selection When we asked shoppers what they most want from an in-store experience, the largest contingent — 31.9% of respondents — said they most value product selection and variety. It’s not a profound revelation to state that brick and mortar is now...