“‘You Can’t Feel A Fact: The Analytical Sales Personality Style’ plus ‘Why Training On the Salesfloor Doesn’t Work (video)'” by Bob Phibbs via The Retail Doctor blog

“‘You Can’t Feel A Fact: The Analytical Sales Personality Style’ plus ‘Why Training On the Salesfloor Doesn’t Work (video)'” by Bob Phibbs via The Retail Doctor blog

When I was looking for a lawn spreader, I asked the sales clerk, “Why should I buy this one?” He quickly answered, “Because it makes sense.” At that moment he confirmed my suspicions that he had an Analytical personality style. I’ve previously shared my thoughts about the Amiable,  Expressive , and Driver personality styles. Today, with their sensible, fact-based approach, I’ll dive into some thoughts about the Analytical. It would be easy to dismiss the Analytical personality style as a bookworm, a techie, a person with too much information because then we would be thinking their depth of knowledge is somehow not relevant. But their focus on detail is what makes their sales ability an asset. No other personality style will delve into as much product knowledge and history as the Analytical. However, Analytical personalities are not necessarily the best fit for most stores. Sure, an antique dealer who is trying to get thousands of dollars for a vintage pair of eyeglasses really needs to be able to share all the reasons to justify the price. Or a luxury jeweler, or stained-glass craftsman, or even a plastic surgeon. Analyticals, like Amiables, tend to be introverted; they can share information as a defense mechanism. Consequently, the more nervous or under pressure they are, the more they will try to calm themselves by reciting facts about a product. The challenge is, only a third of the world really appreciates all that information. 63% or so of the population buys on feeling, not facts. You can’t feel details – most customers buy based on emotions. And for that reason, an untrained Analytical can be a liability for your sales...
“Managing Sales Behaviors to Improve Sales Performance” by Bob Phibbs via The Retail Doctor Blog

“Managing Sales Behaviors to Improve Sales Performance” by Bob Phibbs via The Retail Doctor Blog

What are sales behaviors? They are a series of actions comprised in a sales process, the way salespeople act and talk with shoppers. It is not as some have said your thought process; it is something specific other sales associates can see or hear you do. For example, an associate standing behind the counter talking trash about another customer so everyone can hear is bad sales behavior. Importance of behavioral sales training in retail What are bad sales behaviors? Things a salesperson does that result in the shopper not making a purchase and leaving the store.  For example, I went into a Hugo Boss boutique. I didn’t see any salesperson in the store. I found a shirt I wanted to try on and finally spotted a sales associate in a cubby. I assumed he was finishing a sale with a shopper. I tried to get his attention but couldn’t, so I just tried the shirt on right there on the sales floor. The woman left and I assumed the salesperson would come over. Nope. He just stood in the middle of the store looking out into the mall.  As I walked past him, he said not a word, just stared out into the mall. That was bad sales behavior. What are good sales behaviors? Engaging a stranger, discovering the shopper, and making a sale. For example, at the same mall several hours later, I passed a Rituals skincare boutique. It featured a large hydrangea tree in the center and as I stopped to look, a young woman encouraged me to come in. “No,” I said, “I’m tired and just want...
“If you missed the most recent BRA Retailer Roundtable Panel Discussion at Surf Expo or any of the other three 2021 BRA quarterly webinars, you can view them all right here at no cost” by BRA + Management One

“If you missed the most recent BRA Retailer Roundtable Panel Discussion at Surf Expo or any of the other three 2021 BRA quarterly webinars, you can view them all right here at no cost” by BRA + Management One

Once per Quarter, Board Retailers Association hosts relevant and helpful webinars on a variety of topics in collaboration with BRA Supporting Vendor Partner Management One. You can view all four of these excellent collaborative quarterly webinars below. “5 Things You Need To Know Before Black Friday” (4th Quarter 2021 Collaborative BRA + M1 Webinar) As we begin to plan for 2022, retailers need to focus NOW on key areas in their business to set the stage for success through the holidays and into next year.  Without a doubt, the holiday season will be quite different than last year for both retailers and consumers, so how can you prepare for the unknown? From year-end tax strategies to digital marketing and supply chain moves, retailers will have their hands full in Q4 trying to navigate the challenges. It can be easy to lose sight of what is MOST important and impactful before the new year begins. Our live Q&A includes Paul Erickson of Management One and Doug Works of BRA speaking with Jeff Plattman of CohnReznick, one of the nation’s largest accounting, tax and business advisory firms, to get an informed perspective on how successful retailers need to plan their year-end to be set up for 2022. Push play to view this important 4th Quarter collaborative BRA + M1 webinar “BRA Retailer Roundtable Panel Discussion at Surf Expo – Sept. 2021” (3rd Quarter 2021 Collaborative BRA + M1 Webinar) Concerns about the delta variant contributed to store traffic declines in July, combined with some signs that consumer confidence is wavering. The outlook for business in Q4 is nowhere near certain. In this Board...
“Managing Sales Behaviors to Improve Sales Performance” by Bob Phibbs (The Retail Doctor)

“Managing Sales Behaviors to Improve Sales Performance” by Bob Phibbs (The Retail Doctor)

What are sales behaviors? They are a series of actions comprised in a sales process, the way salespeople act and talk with shoppers. It is not as some have said your thought process; it is something specific other sales associates can see or hear you do. For example, an associate standing behind the counter talking trash about another customer so everyone can hear is bad sales behavior. Importance of behavioral sales training in retail What are bad sales behaviors? Things a salesperson does that result in the shopper not making a purchase and leaving the store.  For example, I went into a Hugo Boss boutique. I didn’t see any salesperson in the store. I found a shirt I wanted to try on and finally spotted a sales associate in a cubby. I assumed he was finishing a sale with a shopper. I tried to get his attention but couldn’t, so I just tried the shirt on right there on the sales floor. The woman left and I assumed the salesperson would come over. Nope. He just stood in the middle of the store looking out into the mall.  As I walked past him, he said not a word, just stared out into the mall. That was bad sales behavior. What are good sales behaviors? Engaging a stranger, discovering the shopper, and making a sale. For example, at the same mall several hours later, I passed a Rituals skincare boutique. It featured a large hydrangea tree in the center and as I stopped to look, a young woman encouraged me to come in. “No,” I said, “I’m tired and just want...
“Help Wanted” by Pam Danziger via The Robin Report

“Help Wanted” by Pam Danziger via The Robin Report

In advance of the holiday season, the National Retail Federation (NRF) reported retailers will hire between 500,000 and 665,000 seasonal workers in November and December. At least some of retail’s 8.5 percent to 10.5 percent projected growth for holiday sales is contingent on retailers having enough employees to ring up the sales, stock the shelves and pull-and-pack the online orders. Employee Shrink Then the November 2021 Bureau of Labor Statistics reported jobs numbers dropped; retail employment declined by 20,000 jobs in October from 15.45 million to 15.43 million in November. Job gains in food and beverage stores (+9,000), buildings materials and garden supply stores (+7,000) and non-store retailers (+4,000) partially offset losses in general merchandise stores (-20,000), clothing and fashion accessories stores (-18,000) and sporting goods, hobby, book and music stores (-9,000). Retailers need to explore ways to make jobs more satisfying and fulfilling and to provide employees a path to a sustainable career. Pay and benefits are one thing but there are other non-pay factors that retailers need to consider. It all comes down to changing the employee value proposition. Overall, retail employment stands 176,000 lower in November 2021 than pre-pandemic February 2020. Even though the average weekly pay for a non-supervisory retail employee is now 13 percent higher than it was in February 2020 – $583 now versus $516 then – and 11 percent more on an hourly basis – $18.86/hour compared with $16.98/hour – retailers still can’t attract enough workers to fill their employment gap. The situation is even more pressing as national unemployment stands at 4.2 percent. Great Retail Walkout Throughout 2021, Boston Consulting Group (BCG)...
“12 Secrets of a Successful 2021 Holiday Season for Retail Managers” by Bob Phibbs (The Retail Doctor)

“12 Secrets of a Successful 2021 Holiday Season for Retail Managers” by Bob Phibbs (The Retail Doctor)

Taking on retail manager responsibilities is a big job at any time but especially during the holidays. Making an awful lot of people happy at the holidays doesn’t happen unless you have already put the effort in with your own team. When I was in college, I worked nights and weekends in a department store. I was there for the guys shopping on Christmas Eve and for the after-holiday sales, returns, and exchanges. Later, I changed jobs and quickly took on the retail manager responsibilities of a shop in the mall. My part-time retail job became my career. Mind you, I had no training to become a retail store manager and hadn’t even been an assistant manager. I had sold product really well. I showed up on time. I pitched in. I got good reviews and had loyal customers, but that work experience hadn’t prepared me for retail management, managing people, or what the season would be like as a manager. If that’s you, I’m going to share with you the 12 secrets of a successful holiday season. Think of this time in your life like getting a bachelor’s degree in running a store. If you’re a veteran store manager, these tips should remind you of what’s about to happen and help you make your sales goals. 12 Secrets of a Successful Holiday Season for a Retail Manager 1. It’s fun, customers will surprise you. You’ll meet the couple out shopping together and the guy really wants something, but his wife will say no, then give you a sign, return to pick it up and tell you after the holiday how...