“How to Enhance Recruitment and Retention Through Employee Engagement” by Chad Jensen via Total Retail

“How to Enhance Recruitment and Retention Through Employee Engagement” by Chad Jensen via Total Retail

COVID-19 continued to make its presence known across industries in 2021. While businesses successfully adapted their work environments, many struggled to keep employees engaged, or even retain them, as well as find new employees to hire. Eighty-five percent of employees now feel unmotivated in their current roles, and 64 percent are job searching. Employees want to feel connected to their workplaces, and they’re searching for opportunities that offer such an environment. To adapt to this current employee need, business leaders must create better environments for people to work in. A pivotal step in doing this is enhancing employee engagement and company culture. Create a Culture of Service A 2019 Glassdoor survey found 77 percent of adults consider culture before applying for a job, highlighting the importance of a strong company culture. One step in attaining this is creating a culture of service. A culture of service is designed for company executives to serve their employees the same way employees are expected to serve customers. The hope is that employees take the positive experiences they receive from leadership and apply them to customer interactions. When employees feel valued within the company, they’re more likely to make sure each customer feels valued as well. Strategies to create a culture of service can include an open-door communication policy that extends from your leadership team to every part of your employee base. This enables constant lines of communication throughout the organization and ensures complete transparency. Another idea is expanding mentorship programs for employees, allowing them to continue to grow professionally and personally, showing the organization cares about their development. Related story: Place Employee Experience...
“Retail Customer Service Training: 14 Ideas, Plus Examples” by Bob Phibbs via The Retail Doctor blog

“Retail Customer Service Training: 14 Ideas, Plus Examples” by Bob Phibbs via The Retail Doctor blog

The goal of retail customer service training is to create an exceptional customer experience. So, what do you focus on when you teach your employees how to give customers exceptional experiences? Sometimes good customer service means something quick, cheap, and easy. Think picking up a quart of milk at a convenience store on the way home or using the Starbucks app to get your drink without waiting.  But for most stores looking to increase retail sales — and I mean most — quick and easy is not the way to profitability. If you add in cheap when talking about retail customer service best practices … it gets even worse. What is exceptional customer service? Exceptional customer service makes the shopper feel like the most important person in the world. Even if it’s only for a few seconds, retail associates can create this feeling by going out of their way to make customers feel appreciated and happy to spend money in your store. To consistently achieve this level of customer service, it has to be an established core value. Just like any organization, you have to know what your store stands for and what it doesn’t. But you can’t just post a mission statement on your website or put up compelling signage and call it a day. A brick-and-mortar retailer looking to create exceptional shopping experiences and lasting customer relationships has to live out that message on the sales floor.  “You have to believe it, show it, and deliver it.” That’s why your retail customer service training has to include more than product knowledge and learning the point of sale system. Your retail employees need to know how to create a...
“How to Increase Retail Sales in 2022 With Virtual Queuing” by Steve Covate via Total Retail

“How to Increase Retail Sales in 2022 With Virtual Queuing” by Steve Covate via Total Retail

Photo Credit: Getty Images If the last two years have taught retailers anything, it might be that workforce trends can be just as unpredictable as consumer trends. The industry has always faced challenges in hiring and retaining talent, but the current labor shortage is nearly unprecedented. Workforce struggles paired with customers who are generally more finicky and impatient are forcing brick-and-mortar retailers to rethink their strategies. Keeping employees happy has become almost as important as keeping customers happy — and the way people feel at work matters just as much as the wages you’re paying and the value you’re providing. Virtual queuing offers a way to improve the experience for workers and consumers alike. Changing the ways customers wait for service may seem like a minor adjustment, but the potential to increase efficiency, staff morale and, perhaps most importantly, sales is significant. In 2022, this potential can’t be overlooked. Related story: 3 Things to Consider for Omnichannel Success A Variety of Use Cases Virtual queuing is based on a simple idea: instead of standing in a physical line, customers check into a queue on their smartphones, then are notified when their turn comes up. Customers are free to do whatever they want — including shopping other parts of the store — while they “wait.” The wait itself becomes productive in that customers can ask questions and provide additional information to staff so that when they reach the front of the virtual queue, employees are better prepared to deliver outstanding service. Customers also can receive updates on estimated wait times and can even be sent virtual offers — e.g., digital coupons...
“‘You Can’t Feel A Fact: The Analytical Sales Personality Style’ plus ‘Why Training On the Salesfloor Doesn’t Work (video)'” by Bob Phibbs via The Retail Doctor blog

“‘You Can’t Feel A Fact: The Analytical Sales Personality Style’ plus ‘Why Training On the Salesfloor Doesn’t Work (video)'” by Bob Phibbs via The Retail Doctor blog

When I was looking for a lawn spreader, I asked the sales clerk, “Why should I buy this one?” He quickly answered, “Because it makes sense.” At that moment he confirmed my suspicions that he had an Analytical personality style. I’ve previously shared my thoughts about the Amiable,  Expressive , and Driver personality styles. Today, with their sensible, fact-based approach, I’ll dive into some thoughts about the Analytical. It would be easy to dismiss the Analytical personality style as a bookworm, a techie, a person with too much information because then we would be thinking their depth of knowledge is somehow not relevant. But their focus on detail is what makes their sales ability an asset. No other personality style will delve into as much product knowledge and history as the Analytical. However, Analytical personalities are not necessarily the best fit for most stores. Sure, an antique dealer who is trying to get thousands of dollars for a vintage pair of eyeglasses really needs to be able to share all the reasons to justify the price. Or a luxury jeweler, or stained-glass craftsman, or even a plastic surgeon. Analyticals, like Amiables, tend to be introverted; they can share information as a defense mechanism. Consequently, the more nervous or under pressure they are, the more they will try to calm themselves by reciting facts about a product. The challenge is, only a third of the world really appreciates all that information. 63% or so of the population buys on feeling, not facts. You can’t feel details – most customers buy based on emotions. And for that reason, an untrained Analytical can be a liability for your sales...
“Managing Sales Behaviors to Improve Sales Performance” by Bob Phibbs via The Retail Doctor Blog

“Managing Sales Behaviors to Improve Sales Performance” by Bob Phibbs via The Retail Doctor Blog

What are sales behaviors? They are a series of actions comprised in a sales process, the way salespeople act and talk with shoppers. It is not as some have said your thought process; it is something specific other sales associates can see or hear you do. For example, an associate standing behind the counter talking trash about another customer so everyone can hear is bad sales behavior. Importance of behavioral sales training in retail What are bad sales behaviors? Things a salesperson does that result in the shopper not making a purchase and leaving the store.  For example, I went into a Hugo Boss boutique. I didn’t see any salesperson in the store. I found a shirt I wanted to try on and finally spotted a sales associate in a cubby. I assumed he was finishing a sale with a shopper. I tried to get his attention but couldn’t, so I just tried the shirt on right there on the sales floor. The woman left and I assumed the salesperson would come over. Nope. He just stood in the middle of the store looking out into the mall.  As I walked past him, he said not a word, just stared out into the mall. That was bad sales behavior. What are good sales behaviors? Engaging a stranger, discovering the shopper, and making a sale. For example, at the same mall several hours later, I passed a Rituals skincare boutique. It featured a large hydrangea tree in the center and as I stopped to look, a young woman encouraged me to come in. “No,” I said, “I’m tired and just want...
“Managing Sales Behaviors to Improve Sales Performance” by Bob Phibbs (The Retail Doctor)

“Managing Sales Behaviors to Improve Sales Performance” by Bob Phibbs (The Retail Doctor)

What are sales behaviors? They are a series of actions comprised in a sales process, the way salespeople act and talk with shoppers. It is not as some have said your thought process; it is something specific other sales associates can see or hear you do. For example, an associate standing behind the counter talking trash about another customer so everyone can hear is bad sales behavior. Importance of behavioral sales training in retail What are bad sales behaviors? Things a salesperson does that result in the shopper not making a purchase and leaving the store.  For example, I went into a Hugo Boss boutique. I didn’t see any salesperson in the store. I found a shirt I wanted to try on and finally spotted a sales associate in a cubby. I assumed he was finishing a sale with a shopper. I tried to get his attention but couldn’t, so I just tried the shirt on right there on the sales floor. The woman left and I assumed the salesperson would come over. Nope. He just stood in the middle of the store looking out into the mall.  As I walked past him, he said not a word, just stared out into the mall. That was bad sales behavior. What are good sales behaviors? Engaging a stranger, discovering the shopper, and making a sale. For example, at the same mall several hours later, I passed a Rituals skincare boutique. It featured a large hydrangea tree in the center and as I stopped to look, a young woman encouraged me to come in. “No,” I said, “I’m tired and just want...