“If you missed the BRA Retailer Roundtable Panel Discussion at Surf Expo, you can view it and other relevant and helpful educational webinars right here” by BRA + Management One

“If you missed the BRA Retailer Roundtable Panel Discussion at Surf Expo, you can view it and other relevant and helpful educational webinars right here” by BRA + Management One

Concerns about the delta variant contributed to store traffic declines in July, combined with some signs that consumer confidence is wavering. The outlook for business in Q4 is nowhere near certain. In this Board Retailers Association (BRA) Retailer Roundtable panel discussion, the panelists speak about how these factors are affecting independent retailers plans for holiday selling this year. In addition, the panel explored and shared current pricing practices that have increased operating margins in their stores as well as significant staffing challenges. These competitive pricing and staffing strategies can be implemented in your store immediately. This remarkable panel was moderated by George Leichtweiss (BRA Chairman and owner of Modern Skate & Surf) and included Paul Erickson (Director and Senior Retail Consultant at BRA Supporting Vendor Partner Management One), Bruce Cromartie (BRA Board Member and Owner of BC Surf & Sport) and Doug Works (BRA Executive Director and former retailer). Push play to view this remarkable BRA Retailer Roundtable Panel Discussion from Surf Expo – 9 21 Massive thanks to Jesse of Podium (BRA Supporting Vendor Partner) for introducing their remarkable retail resource and sponsoring this outstanding event. Learn more about Podium in the following article: BRA Podium 4 Ways Article The video above serves as the 2021 3rd Quarterly BRA + Management One Webinar. At the end of the each Quarter, Board Retailers Association hosts relevant and helpful quarterly webinars on a variety of topics in collaboration with BRA Supporting Vendor Partner Management One. Push play to view the 2nd Quarterly BRA + Management One Webinar of 2021 Push play to view the 1st Quarterly BRA + Management One Webinar of...
“Key Industry Surf Shops Impacted by Oil Spill” by Tiffany Montgomery via Shop Eat Surf

“Key Industry Surf Shops Impacted by Oil Spill” by Tiffany Montgomery via Shop Eat Surf

Workers cleaning oil that washed ashore on Corona Del Mar State Beach Wednesday – Photo courtesy of U.S. Coast Guard The oil spill in Orange County that has closed beaches in Huntington Beach, Newport Beach, Laguna Beach, and Dana Point is not only a crisis for the environment, it also could have a major impact on important industry stores and other businesses in the area. “This is an ecological and economic crisis for the city of Huntington Beach,” said Aaron Pai, the owner of Huntington Surf & Sport on Main Street. “I feel for all the animals and businesses affected.” Last weekend, Huntington Beach was packed due to the Pacific Air Show, which draws thousands of people to the beach to watch the planes perform off the coast. HSS was a sponsor of the event, which ended up being cancelled on Sunday, the last day of the show. “We had to navigate through COVID, and now we’ll have to navigate through this,” Aaron said. The spill has also cancelled this weekend’s City of Huntington Beach Surf Contest, which HSS was also sponsoring. The only good news is that the spill didn’t happen in the height of summer, Aaron said. Huntington Beach also just hosted the WSL’s U.S. Open of Surfing at the end of September. “Thank God it didn’t happen during the U.S. Open,” said Bobby Abdel, a partner at Jack’s Surfboards, whose flagship store is directly across from the beach in Huntington. “Can you imagine?” Jack’s has already noticed a drop in traffic as people avoid Huntington Beach because of the spill and the negative publicity. “There’s no...
“Just How Much Does Music Change the Way We View Surfing?” by Juan Hernandez via The Inertia

“Just How Much Does Music Change the Way We View Surfing?” by Juan Hernandez via The Inertia

That headline was a rhetorical question. Of course music impacts our viewing of surf videos. A lot. In fact, music doesn’t just have an effect on how we view surfing, a guy like Quentin Tarantino would argue music completely controls how we feel about anything watched on film. And he’s pretty good at making films. Music is an integral piece in the storytelling experience and surf flicks are no exception. Cue Brad Jacobson, a videographer and filmmaker based in Los Angeles’ South Bay who doesn’t make your typical daily or weekly surf-porn vlog. He watches more footage each day than most of us can fathom after hours on end of watching our lineup habits and behavior through the lens of a camera. It leads him to ask questions like “Do average surfers have the most fun?” or “What’s up with all the weird faces we make while surfing?” They’re refreshing quips on things many of us notice in the everyday lineup but probably don’t actually talk about. Yes, that classic steel guitar leaves us yearning for the old days. Everything about surfing in the 1990s had a very specific and familiar sound. You can almost feel the paper-thin, 6’6″ thruster under your feet while picturing Kelly Slater with hair. Clown-car music and a wipeout reel? Makes sense. Ska? LET’S GO! Jacobson runs through an entire library of sounds here and looks for which types of waves and performance works for each. While we all know surfing is best (or at least most often) paired with certain genres, you probably haven’t taken the time to watch the same two or three clips paired with six different genres, back to back. It’s a...
“A LOOK AT SOME OF SKATEBOARDING’S GREATEST DISPLAYS OF FILMING” by Justin The Intern via Jenkem Mag

“A LOOK AT SOME OF SKATEBOARDING’S GREATEST DISPLAYS OF FILMING” by Justin The Intern via Jenkem Mag

To some skaters out there, filming might seem like a pretty simple task. First, you have to buy a half-decent camera with a fisheye, and then all you really have to do is keep the skater in the frame and make sure the colors aren’t too blown out. Easy, right? Maybe, but when you start to really focus on the technique, you start to see there’s a big difference between the regular Joes and skateboarding’s elite filmers. To shine some light on the real lens tacticians out there, we’ve compiled a list of some standout maneuvers that filmers have pulled off that others couldn’t (or wouldn’t) for the sake of keeping themselves and their camera safe. Feel free to bitch and moan in the comments about what clips we forgot to include. BRIAN PANEBIANCO – SABOTAGE X DC Philadelphia is a city of history. From the founding fathers to Rocky Balboa to the DC team, Philly has seen it all. In the new Sabotage x DC video, Brian Panebianco kicks off his own part by doing a Varial Heel while filming Kevin Bilyeu at Muni. Everything about it oozes a calculated maneuver that might be the coolest most nonchalant thing a filmer has ever done; baggy sweatpants, bulky Lynxes, and a somehow perfectly caught varial heel. This clip was good enough to earn Brian his place in Boil The Ocean’s “Filmers Who Rip on the Board Hall of Fame” and a spot on this list. JACOB HARRIS – ATLANTIC DRIFT: TOM KNOX Everybody remembers this part because Tom Knox performs some of the smoothest skating on some of the roughest ground. But Jacob Harris’ filming often goes...
“SQUARE AND TIKTOK PARTNER TO HELP BUSINESSES EXPAND THEIR REACH ONLINE” via Industry Resource

“SQUARE AND TIKTOK PARTNER TO HELP BUSINESSES EXPAND THEIR REACH ONLINE” via Industry Resource

Square and TikTok announced a new integration that will make it easy for sellers of all types and sizes to reach new customers and grow their sales online. Square x TikTok enables sellers to send fans directly from TikTok videos, ads, and shopping tabs on their profiles to products available in their existing Square Online store, providing a streamlined shopping experience that retains the look and feel of their personal brand. To take advantage of these powerful new commerce features from TikTok, TikTok For Business users can now quickly and easily set up a free, fully integrated Square Online store and start selling right away. Jessica Thompson (@beejoyfuljess), owner of the Bee Joyful Shop, a zero-waste and sustainable living shop in Dexter, Michigan said that the Square x TikTok integration has helped her reach new customers in a new, and lucrative market. “TikTok is huge right now and only continuing to grow. With Square x TikTok we’re able to quickly and easily feature our products in our TikTok content and seamlessly direct buyers to our Square Online store,” she said. “We’re really excited to give fans an easier way to shop, directly from the platform where they’re already spending their time.” With a billion monthly active users, TikTok is one of the world’s fastest growing social media platforms. Reaching this audience provides sellers with a valuable opportunity, especially as the lines between entrepreneurship, content creation, and commerce continue to blur. With Square x TikTok, sellers are able to grow their business by running ads using TikTok Ads Manager, sync their existing item catalog to TikTok for inclusion in curated shopping tabs on their profiles, and include...
“Analysts throw cold water on the great DTC pivot” by Ben Unglesbee via Retail Dive

“Analysts throw cold water on the great DTC pivot” by Ben Unglesbee via Retail Dive

image courtesy of Daphne Howland/Retail Dive Dive Brief: As brands large and small try to capture more margin by selling directly to consumers, analysts with BMO Capital Markets question whether the strategy is truly more profitable.In a recent report, the analysts found that wholesale sales come with higher margins before taxes and interest than DTC sales. Moreover, shifts to DTC channels could translate into lower sales dollars overall even though brands capture more of the sales price for themselves. The BMO analysts wrote that “although revenue per item grows at DTC, the units lost by abandoning wholesale generally overwhelm the unit price lifts at DTC.” Dive Insight: Nike is doing it. Adidas is doing it. Crocs is doing it. Canada Goose, Vera Bradley and Michael Kors are doing it. Brands across the board have been expanding and prioritizing their direct channels, often to the detriment of retailers that rely on national brands to drive their own sales.  The strategy is based on the straightforward promise that brands can capture more of the sale price of a product and thus keep more of the profits. But the BMO report calls into question the formula that more DTC sales equal higher profits.  The analysts estimate that wholesale margins are about 1,000 basis points higher on average than those of DTC, prior to taxes and interest payments. The reasons for that are not really known with any certainty. The BMO analysts suggest a few theories, including that the scale of wholesale sales reduces the cost of goods sold and that wholesale sales boost the visibility of a brand.  For a brand, making DTC sales online is a costly venture compared to...