“Teenagers Win All 3 Medals In Women’s Street Skateboarding Event” by Leila Fadel via NPR

“Teenagers Win All 3 Medals In Women’s Street Skateboarding Event” by Leila Fadel via NPR

Momiji Nishiya of Team Japan celebrates during the Women’s Street Final on day three of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games on Monday at Ariake Urban Sports Park. Patrick Smith/Getty Images TOKYO — Thirteen-year-old Momiji Nishiya dazzled during the Olympic women’s skateboarding street competition. She skated through a park of rails, ramps and stairs meant to mimic city street parks at the Ariake Urban Sports Park. When she finished, she became Japan’s youngest-ever gold medal winner and one of the youngest Olympic champions of all time. Nishiya shared the podium with two other teenagers. It “could very well be the youngest Olympic podium ever,” the official Olympics news outlet says. Nishiya’s win also sealed Japan’s domination of the street competition. It debuted at these Summer Olympics and organizers hope it infuses the global sports event with youthful energy. In fact, half of the women in the eight-skateboarder final were 16 or younger. Brazil’s Rayssa Leal, a few months younger than Nishiya, took silver. Another Japanese skateboarder Funa Nakayama, 16, won bronze. Nishiya’s victory came the day after Japan’s Yuto Horigome, 22, took the gold in the men’s street competition. The sport is one of several new games at the Olympics this year including surfing, three on three basketball and rock climbing. NPR is an independent, nonprofit media organization that was founded on a mission to create a more informed public. Every day, NPR connects with millions of Americans on the air, online, and in person to explore the news, ideas, and what it means to be human. Through its network of member stations, NPR makes local stories national, national stories local, and global...
“Kellen James and Jamie Palmore (KJP) | Hickman” via Transworld Skateboarding

“Kellen James and Jamie Palmore (KJP) | Hickman” via Transworld Skateboarding

Kellen James (owner of Arts and Rec Skate Shop) and Jamie Palmore come together for the first (and hopefully not the only) installment of the KJP (KJ + JP = KJP) series. First spot: Hickman. Guest appearances by:Jimmy Cao, Kyong Kim, Joe Blas, Marshall Heath, Chris LaRue, Adam Sullivan, and Mike Fitzgerald. Film and edit: Matthew Reyes Transworld Skateboarding is an excellent source of skateboarding news and related content. Be sure to bookmark: https://skateboarding.transworld.net/ If you are not yet a BRA Retail Member, you can easily opt in to either Regular (no cost) or Distinguished ($99/yr.) Membership via this super simple join...
“Skateboarding as an Olympic sport has even some on Team USA feeling conflicted” by Phil McCausland via NBC News

“Skateboarding as an Olympic sport has even some on Team USA feeling conflicted” by Phil McCausland via NBC News

Members of the first U.S. Olympic skateboarding team arrive on their boards for a news conference in downtown Los Angeles on June 21, 2021.Richard Vogel / AP “I think as a community, people were attracted to skateboarding because it was not part of something like the Olympics; it was not mainstream,” one expert said. For decades skateboarders have tossed on a beat up pair of sneakers and hunted for their town’s best skate spots. This month, however, eighty of the world’s best skaters will don sleek Olympic uniforms and look for judges’ point totals as skateboarding makes its debut as an Olympic sport in Tokyo. Some in the skateboarding community — including members of the U.S. national team — have mixed feelings about skating’s ongoing “sportification,” however, and have shared fears of further oversight and rigidity in a culture that values independence and self expression. USA’s first Olympic skateboarders: ‘It’s going to open doors’ AUG. 14, 201902:52 That dissonance echoes throughout skateboarding. Since becoming popular in Southern California in the 1960s, skateboarders have shaped film, fashion, music, video games, art, photography and writing. Tens of millions of skaters worldwide now make up a diverse and sought-after community — and a multibillion-dollar industry — while still remaining a counterculture powerhouse known for its rebellious inclinations. “I think as a community, people were attracted to skateboarding because it was not part of something like the Olympics; it was not mainstream,” said Ian Michna, the editor of Jenkem Magazine, a skateboarding and culture magazine. “It was more of an artistic activity you could do on your own independently and shape your own way, be your own...
“What If We Told You That You Could Protect Your New Surfboard Against Breaks And Dings…” via STAB Magazine

“What If We Told You That You Could Protect Your New Surfboard Against Breaks And Dings…” via STAB Magazine

Well, you can. And it starts at just $10 a month.  Posted by: STAB What’s worse: breaking your new board first session, or watching every person you love getting mauled by a voracious pack of lions? Answer: the lions, but only just. New Board Anxiety is a serious medical condition that affects millions of surfers worldwide. If you or any surfer you know has suffered from this debilitating ailment, we present you with a viable (if only marginally costly) solution: Surfcare.  First and foremost, and despite how that intro read, this is not an advertisement. Or, I guess technically it is, but the crew at Surfcare didn’t pay a penny for it, so good on them for creating a product so inherently fascinating that we couldn’t help but write about it.  Second, Surfcare is exactly what it sounds like: AppleCare for your surfboard. It’s actual, genuine, real-life protection that you can buy as financial protection against a dinged or broken board.  Here are their available plans: Below we chatted with Nick Stolz, founder of Surfcare, to get more info on his product and see if the juice is truly worth the squeeze.  What inspired you to start this company? Well, I grew up breaking a ton of boards! Maybe I took that “stomp it” saying a little too literally [laughs]. I came up with the idea in Indonesia three years ago after running through a quiver at HTs. It’s a bad feeling when you spend a bunch of money on a new board and break it first session, or even at all. We all know the feeling. So Surfcare was...
“HOW ROOKIE SKATEBOARDS SHAPED WOMEN’S SKATEBOARDING” by JESSIE VAN ROECHOUDT & QUELL SKATEBOARDING via Jenkem Mag

“HOW ROOKIE SKATEBOARDS SHAPED WOMEN’S SKATEBOARDING” by JESSIE VAN ROECHOUDT & QUELL SKATEBOARDING via Jenkem Mag

Rookie Skateboards, a downtown Manhattan brand founded by Catharine Lyons and Elska von Hatzfeldt in the mid ’90s, has pioneered so much we see out of skating and streetwear today.While it’s not common to this day, it was even more of an anomaly to have a woman-founded skate company at the time when Rookie started. In that era, there were some supporters in the industry who were more open-minded.Like many trailblazing brands and people, Rookie didn’t think twice about supporting women and including them in the skateboarding scene. This piece was written by Jessie Van Roechoudt, a former Rookie team rider, to give us a look into the history and lasting impact of the company. This article was featured in Quell Skateboarding’s latest print issue, “The New York Issue,” and shared with us by out friends over at Quell HQ. Grab a copy of “The New York Issue” here. ROOKIE’S ORIGINS Catharine and Elska founded Rookie in 1996, and today people say Rookie Skateboards was ahead of its time – though it’s more appropriate to say that Rookie’s inclusive team roster, brand identity, and art direction were on point, and the rest of the skate industry just took 25 years to catch up. The catalyst for founding Rookie came about at an art show that was held at the base of the Brooklyn Bridge in the fall of 1995. The show featured a ramp, and the artist invited skaters to skate it as a sculpture in motion. The show was busy and chaotic – and pretty much impossible to even get near the ramp. Catharine and Elska asked the artist if they could come back...
“The Realities of Core Retail at a Time of Huge Demand” by Tiffany Montgomery via Shop Eat Surf

“The Realities of Core Retail at a Time of Huge Demand” by Tiffany Montgomery via Shop Eat Surf

Tim Kirkpatrick, the owner of Wavelines Surf Snow Skate in San Diego – Photo by SES Click on the following link to view this interesting Shop Eat Surf Article: The Realities of Core Retail at a Time of Huge Demand Be sure to visit the Shop Eat Surf website to view valuable Industry News and Resourceful Articles regularly via this link: Shop Eat Surf If you are not already a BRA Retail Member, you can easily opt in to either Regular (no cost) or Distinguished ($99/yr.) Membership via this super simple join...