“A VISUAL GUIDE TO SKATING CARS” by Larry Lanza via Jenkem Mag

“A VISUAL GUIDE TO SKATING CARS” by Larry Lanza via Jenkem Mag

According to a stat I just made up, there are about one billion cars currently in circulation across the globe. Yeah, cars are a leading cause of global warming and an insane amount of deaths, but they offer endless possibilities for the people who own them. Besides just driving them to your shitty job, you can soup them up Mad Max style, get laid in the backseat, and of course, use them to get an unforgettable clip. Skating on cars is definitely not a new trend. In fact, Natas was doing it 25 years before I could legally drive. Since then the tricks have gone to new heights, just like gas prices, and there have even been entire videos dedicated to skating cars. So in honor of the pioneers of car shredding, we sifted through tons of footage to pick out some of our favorite car clips to share with you. Before you ask, no, this post isn’t sponsored by Toyota like all the US Olympic athletes are. But if anyone from Toyota happens to be reading this, if you give me a free Tacoma, I’ll be sure to skate the bed of the truck and post it to the ‘gram. NATAS KAUPAS – STREETS ON FIRE [1989] Like most things in street skating, Natas is the true trendsetter when it comes to skating on cars. This boardslide in Streets on Fire is likely one of the reasons a ton of contests in the early ‘90s had a random car in the middle of the course. Thankfully, the whole high tops with high socks thing Natas was pushing here was a trend that was lost to time....
“Russian Surfing Federation Issues Defiant Statement After ISA Bans Russian Athletes” by Alexander Haro via The Inertia

“Russian Surfing Federation Issues Defiant Statement After ISA Bans Russian Athletes” by Alexander Haro via The Inertia

The Ukraine National Surfing team competing in the finals in Odessa in the Black Sea of Ukraine at the Ukrainian National Championships. Photo: USF/Courtesy of ISA Russia is currently invading Ukraine in what is the largest conventional military conflict on the European continent since World War II. Scenes from the region are heartbreaking. As of this writing, more than 1,000,000 civilians have fled Ukraine, and the European Union is estimating that up to four million people might follow. The world, for the most part, is unified in its opposition to the unprompted Russian attack. The International Surfing Association (along with other athletic governing bodies) announced it had decided to impose strict sporting exclusions on athletes and officials from Russia and that it stands in full solidarity with Ukraine. The ban is in line with the International Olympic Committee’s (IOC) recommendations. It means that “no athletes and officials from Russia will be invited to participate or attend ISA events until further notice.” In addition, the ISA says it “will not consider staging any ISA events in Russia for the foreseeable future.” “The global surfing community is shocked and appalled by the awful act of aggression by Russia and Belarus’ role to facilitate their invasion of Ukraine,” said the ISA in a statement posted on its site and distributed via email. “We are unequivocal in our views on this crisis and we stand in full solidarity with Ukraine and the Ukrainian people. This is a human tragedy that requires us all to take a strong stance and send a message that such violence will not tolerated nor forgotten.” “The ISA’s decisions serve to ensure the safety of the public, athletes and...
“The One-Legged Snowboarder Who Built an Ingenious Prosthetic for Himself—and His Opponents” by John Rosengren via GQ

“The One-Legged Snowboarder Who Built an Ingenious Prosthetic for Himself—and His Opponents” by John Rosengren via GQ

Mike Schultz riding in the adaptive banked slalom final during the 2017 Dew Tour Ezra Shaw / Getty Images After a horrific accident took his leg, Mike Schultz invented a high-tech artificial limb that action sport athletes quickly adopted. And now, to win gold at the Beijing Paralympics, he’ll have to beat them. They called him Monster Mike. For the way he threw his sled around on the professional snowmobile circuit and muscled his dirt bike over motocross courses. Arms of steel, gut on fire. Unstoppable. Until that day in December 2008. He was in Ironwood, Michigan, the second stop on the International Series of Champions tour, what they called the NASCAR of snowmobile racing. On a downhill stretch of the course, Schultz charged from the back of the field, gunning his machine to 40 miles per hour. Then he caught a hole. His snowmobile shimmied from side to side, kicked, and bucked him into the air. He slammed feet first, full force, into the packed snow, flipped, and landed on his back. The impact so mangled his left knee that he stared down at the sole of his boot. When the EMT arrived and slit open his pant leg, a gallon of blood gushed out. That’s what his wife, a registered nurse, saw when she arrived with a race official: her husband lying in snow stained red. She dropped to her knees by his side. “He was in agony,” Sara Schultz recalls, “making a low, moaning sound.” Mike was going into shock. She tried to help him focus on his breathing. They loaded him onto a toboggan and transferred...
“With a stunning first run, Chloe Kim wins another gold in the halfpipe.” by John Branch via The New York Times

“With a stunning first run, Chloe Kim wins another gold in the halfpipe.” by John Branch via The New York Times

Chloe Kim’s score from her first halfpipe run delivered her second consecutive gold medal in the event.Gabriela Bhaskar/The New York Times Kim was awarded with an untouchable score of 94. Queralt Castellet, of Spain, earned the silver medal, and Sena Tomita, of Japan, won bronze, neither seriously threatening Kim’s performance. Kim tried to ratchet the degree of difficulty in her final two runs, the way she had four years ago. She fell both times. It didn’t matter. The contest was over nearly as quickly as it had started. “Not to discount any of these riders, but she has a bag of tricks that not anyone else does,” Kim’s longtime coach, Rick Bower, said. “And she showcased that in her first run.”The victory felt less like a coronation for Kim, now 21, but a personal comeback of sorts. The lingering question as she scooted away was what happens next. Four years ago, Kim arrived to the 2018 Olympics and landed into the embrace of a warm South Korean crowd, a loving family and instant stardom. She was 17. It all seemed so easy. The 2022 Olympic halfpipe final had none of that, except in the pipe itself. There was no crowd because of the pandemic. Her family did not attend. And Kim is now 21. This is a different time and a different Kim. Chloe Kim fell on her second and third runs but still remained in first place with a 94.Credit…Gabriela Bhaskar/The New York Times The attention from the last Olympic victory, and some of the nastiness, even within snowboarding circles, nearly chased her from the sport. She didn’t strap...
“IOC approves proposal to include skateboarding, surfing and rock climbing at 2028 LA Olympics” by David Wharton via LA Times

“IOC approves proposal to include skateboarding, surfing and rock climbing at 2028 LA Olympics” by David Wharton via LA Times

An LA 2028 sign is seen in front of the Olympic cauldron at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum.(Richard Vogel / Associated Press) BEIJING —  The International Olympic Committee has approved a proposal to include surfing, skateboarding and sport climbing among the core sports for the 2028 Summer Games in Los Angeles. The decision came during an IOC session on Thursday, a day before the opening ceremony for the Winter Olympics. “The LA28 Games have always been about bringing more freshness, youthful energy and creativity into the Olympic and Paralympic movement,” Casey Wasserman, chairman of the L.A. organizing committee, said in a statement. As prototypical Southern California activities, surfing, skateboarding and sport climbing made their Olympic debut in Tokyo last summer and will be included in the “additional” list for Paris in 2024. They fit with an IOC campaign to attract young fans to an international competition that has seen its viewership continually skew older. Keeping the new sports around for 2028 represents another step toward cementing their place among more traditional events. “We have always known that surfing was a natural fit for LA28,” said Fernando Aguerre, president of the sport’s international federation. “As the official sport of California, surfing is action, youth and energy combined.” LA28, which still has the opportunity to add “additional” sports, marked Thursday’s announcement by releasing new, specialized logos. The organizing committee had previously unveiled an adaptable emblem that allows artists, athletes and celebrities to craft their own versions of the “A” in LA28. Singer Billie Eilish and actress Reese Witherspoon have contributed, as have a streetwear designer, a chef and a tattoo artist. Pro surfer Carissa Moore...
“A Brief History of Snowboarding – Rebellious youth. Olympic glory. How a goofy American pastime conquered winter” by Max Ufberg via Smithsonian Magazine

“A Brief History of Snowboarding – Rebellious youth. Olympic glory. How a goofy American pastime conquered winter” by Max Ufberg via Smithsonian Magazine

Snowboarder Shannon Dunn competes for Team USA in the 1998 Winter Olympics, where she won the bronze medal in half-pipe. Alexander Hassenstein / Bongarts via Getty Images Long before the term “snowboarding” existed—and at least 80 years before it was an Olympic phenomenon—people were zipping like surfers down snow-covered hills. The first known instance came in 1917, when 13-year-old Vern Wicklund stood on a modified sled that he rode down his parents’ backyard in Cloquet, Minnesota. Wicklund patented the idea nearly two decades later but produced only a handful of models. The sport picked up speed in 1965, when Michigan’s Sherman Poppen created the Snurfer by cross-bracing two skis and adding a string at the front for steering. Poppen sold close to one million units by 1970.  Sherman Poppen created the Snurfer, immediate forerunner to the modern snowboard, in 1965. Courtesy Snurfer LLC But the real breakthrough happened when Dimitrije Milovich, a Cornell University dropout, founded Winterstick, the first modern snowboard company, in 1972. With steel edges, laminated fiberglass and, most crucially, nylon straps for one’s feet, Winterstick’s boards allowed riders to fly through more treacherous topography than its predecessors had.  Snowboarding went mainstream soon thereafter amid a fierce rivalry between Jake Burton Carpenter and Tom Sims. Sims, a New Jersey-raised professional skateboarder more interested in aerial stunts than in speed, founded SIMS Snowboarding in 1976. Carpenter, a race enthusiast from Long Island credited with coining “snowboarding,” created Burton Boards one year later.  “They’re endangering the public and possibly themselves!” As snowboarding grew in popularity, so did its reputation as a pastime for screwballs—a counterculture to skiing’s establishment vibe. In the 1980s, most North American ski...