“Airports and Mountain Resorts” by Jeff Harbough via JH&A Market Watch Blog

“Airports and Mountain Resorts” by Jeff Harbough via JH&A Market Watch Blog

Seattle’s main airport is surrounded by communities and has grown like a weed right along with the Seattle metropolitan area.  It has no practical way to expand.  Through recent technology and some clever evolution of facilities the airport authority is doing everything it can to shoehorn more passengers and flights into the same space.  But there’s a limit.  Airplanes, which are big and fast moving, need a certain minimum vertical and horizontal separation no matter how sophisticated the technology of the plane and control systems are.  They also need to park and move around while they are on the ground. The same is true of skiers and snowboarders at mountain resorts in case you hadn’t figured out where I was going with this. It’s unlikely many new winter resorts are going to open.  Climate change, at least for the immediate future, will mean an overall decline in snow days and season length (yes, I know- good for some mountains, bad for others).  Here’s an interesting article on how conditions are evolving in Norway. Like with airports, technology in the form of snow making, faster lifts, etc. will try to ameliorate this where possible.  And mountain resorts will increasingly try to build their year around business. It might be ten years ago I first suggested the National Ski Areas Association change its name to the National Mountain Resort Association.  Still waiting, though the case is even stronger now.  I’m wondering if resorts, or I suppose resort groups as things have evolved, will offer not just multi resort but multi season passes.  Consider the permutations of passes you could sell- not just days...
“From Seed To Culture – Shaheen Sadeghi ran global giant Quiksilver back when soulless malls ruled the retail landscape. Now, he’s building the future at his cool, community-focused shop, Seed Peoples Market.” by Doug Schnitzspahn via Outdoor Retailer Magazine

“From Seed To Culture – Shaheen Sadeghi ran global giant Quiksilver back when soulless malls ruled the retail landscape. Now, he’s building the future at his cool, community-focused shop, Seed Peoples Market.” by Doug Schnitzspahn via Outdoor Retailer Magazine

Seed Peoples Market won an Outdoor Retailer Innovation Award in January 2020, but when I visit the Costa Mesa, California-based shop, I don’t walk out with anything I saw in the aisles at that Show. Instead of a recycled polyester Patagonia jacket or a technical headlamp, I leave with a beautiful set of wooden knives. This isn’t because the store failed to do its job—instead it made me discover something beyond my outdoor brain. I had, after all, wanted a set of knives like this for cheeses, but I never would have found them, or bought them otherwise. And this all went down exactly the way Shaheen Sadeghi planned it. Former Quiksilver president Sadeghi left the big corporate world in 1992. He wanted to explore a massive cultural shift he saw happening, to create the type of authenticity consumers were demanding, to build the type of community-focused retail center we now see as the hip norm. Seed People’s Market, which opened in 2013 in a spot once occupied by an Adventure 16, is the cornerstone in The Camp, Sadeghi’s green ecosystem of shops standing out in the bland sameness of SoCal strip malls. “Products with Purpose” is the shop’s mantra, written on the wall on a chalkboard—and that is what shoppers will find in the space here that feels like a mashup of World Market and Adventure 16 in its heyday. It’s a bazaar of sustainable, local-made, hand-made, and eco-conscious items and classic outdoor offerings that keep customers engaged. It’s also the culmination of Sadeghi’s vision of retail as a place of connection as well as commerce, the anti-mall....
“HOW BROOKLYN GOT ITS OWN EUROPEAN STYLE SKATE SPACE” by Kenny via Jenkem Mag

“HOW BROOKLYN GOT ITS OWN EUROPEAN STYLE SKATE SPACE” by Kenny via Jenkem Mag

You might have seen footage floating around Instagram of a giant new skate spot somewhere in the middle of New York. Known officially as Under the K Bridge Park, this new hotspot is tucked away next to a recycling center and bus yard in the middle of Northern Brooklyn. On the surface, it may seem like just another public city park that’s been taken over by skaters, like Tompkins or TF West, but there is something different about this particular space. K Bridge Park is an anomaly because it breaks a lot of norms we’ve come to expect for newly built public spaces in New York. For one, it’s massive, spanning seven acres, and it’s filled with a ton of skate-friendly obstacles. The ledges and stairs have coping on them and nobody is batting an eye at the dropped-off ramps, rails, or skaters who are there every day. So is it a city park, a proper skatepark, or something else entirely? Should we be worried about an eventual crackdown, or is it actually being used exactly as it was intended? After talking with a few people behind the scenes, we got the story behind the park and what the greater plans are for Brooklyn’s newest spot. To clarify, K Bridge Park is designated as an “open public space,” not an official NYC skatepark, although it has skateable ledges—complete with steel coping—and handrails that are naturally built-in to make the park skate friendly. That means no one’s coming through to knob the ledges or rails here any time soon. It’s actually not even run by the city and is managed by a nonprofit group called the...
“We’re [Outdoor Retailer] Moving Back to Salt Lake City” by Marisa Nichols and Jeff Davis via OutdoorRetailer.com News plus opportunity to be considered for OR SLC Lodging Scholarships

“We’re [Outdoor Retailer] Moving Back to Salt Lake City” by Marisa Nichols and Jeff Davis via OutdoorRetailer.com News plus opportunity to be considered for OR SLC Lodging Scholarships

Since 1982, Outdoor Retailer has brought the outdoor industry together for commerce, to share ideas, and to provide an experience that has grown into more than a trade show. Our community has become family, and for the past five years we’ve held our biannual gatherings in Denver. As our contract nears its natural end after 2022, we’ve been exploring our options and conferring with the industry to map our next steps. After much deliberation and input from all sides, we’ve decided the best move for Outdoor Retailer is to return to our basecamp. We’re heading back to Salt Lake City and County to the place we grew up and where our industry matured into the dynamic and powerful community it is today. Moving forward, Outdoor Retailer will bring the community together in January and June at the Calvin L. Rampton Salt Palace Convention Center. We have a strong relationship with Salt Lake City and a committed partner in Mayor Erin Mendenhall, whose values align with ours following tremendous investments in clean energy and a strong commitment to public lands. This proved to be a real turning point in our recent negotiations. A Commitment to Change Salt Lake City and County is our hometown, and we’re going back with a commitment to effecting meaningful change. It would be wrong for us to leave the way we did and simply go back as if nothing happened. In reality, leaving after 2017 has not brought the change we had hoped for, so we will push back, not pull back. We firmly believe that staying engaged and collectively contributing to the ongoing discussion,...
“Patagonia, REI, Public Lands threaten to boycott Outdoor Retailer trade show” by Cara Salpini via Retail Dive

“Patagonia, REI, Public Lands threaten to boycott Outdoor Retailer trade show” by Cara Salpini via Retail Dive

Dive Brief: A group of major outdoor retailers — including Timberland, Patagonia, REI, The North Face and Public Lands — are threatening to boycott the Outdoor Retailer trade show if it’s moved to Utah, according to a release put out by The Conservation Alliance.The retailers said they would not “support or attend a trade show event in Utah so long as its elected officials continue attacks on national monuments and public lands protections,” adding that Utah “leads the fight against designated national monuments and public lands.”The Outdoor Retailer trade show, worth $45 million, was moved out of Utah in 2017 in objection to the state’s rollback of national monument designations for Bears Ears and Grand Staircase Escalante and has since been held in Denver. Outdoor Retailer said in a statement it has not made a decision around the location of the trade show. Dive Insight: The protection of Bears Ears and Grand Staircase Escalante in Utah has been a focus point for major outdoor retailers for years, with Patagonia in 2017 replacing its homepage with a black screen that declared “The President Stole Your Land” when President Trump reduced the size of the national monuments. The protections have since been restored under President Biden, but The Conservation Alliance on Monday said elected officials in Utah “are once again moving to strip these magnificent lands of federal protection” and asserted they wouldn’t attend a trade show in Utah for as long as the state “continues its assault on public lands.” Utah’s governor, Spencer Cox, released a video bid last year for the trade show to return to Salt Lake City, where it had been hosted for 20...
“Lake Tahoe Breaks Record for Snowfall in December, Closing Resorts and Roads” by Staff writer via The Inertia

“Lake Tahoe Breaks Record for Snowfall in December, Closing Resorts and Roads” by Staff writer via The Inertia

Yeah, it’s deep. Photo: Palisades Tahoe It’s safe to say that Lake Tahoe, Calif. is off to a good start for winter. Maybe too good. The region smashed its record snow total for December, receiving a recorded 193.7 inches, topping the previous record of 179 set in 1970. And there’s still more on the way before the new year. Climate scientists are lauding the storm as  “very beneficial” to the region that has been hit hard by drought in recent years (quite possibly the understatement of the century). Resorts like Heavenly and Palisades were closed yesterday due to snow being too deep, with delayed openings today as well. “Today we broke a record,” wrote Palisades on its social platforms. “This is our biggest December storm in 50 years, and it delivered road closures and avalanche hazards. We’ve received nearly SEVEN FEET of new snow since Wednesday! It will be deep out there this week. Be sure to ski with a buddy, keep them in sight at all times, and avoid tree wells.” Traffic has also been hectic. Road closures have been rife throughout the region. Caltrans announced just hours ago that Highway 50 was closed. Interstate 80 has also seen numerous closures and delays from snow and downed trees. The freeway is currently closed from Colfax to the Nevada state line. In South Lake Tahoe, resorts like Kirkwood were also having trouble digging out from the record dump. The mountain announced it would try to open limited terrain today as avalanche crews made their way to the summits to control terrain. Palisades Tahoe also announced on its blog that has been tracking the storm, that slides cut off patrol workers...