“Ending prices that end in 99 cents” by Al McLain and 29 Retail Experts via Retail Wire

“Ending prices that end in 99 cents” by Al McLain and 29 Retail Experts via Retail Wire

Retailers might want to rethink doing away with prices that end with “.99” if they believe the results of new research from researchers at The Ohio State University’s Fisher College of Business. The study found that setting prices “just below” round numbers (i.e., $19.95, $19.97 or $19.99 instead of $20) can make consumers less likely to spend to upgrade to a more expensive version or size of the product or service. In a coffee stand experiment done on campus, the researchers changed prices hourly, offering a small coffee for 95 cents, or a larger cup for $1.20. Every other hour they would change the offering to $1 for a small cup or a larger cup for $1.25, so both sizes of coffee cost more. When using the latter pricing scheme, 56 percent of customers upgraded to the larger size, versus 29 percent who did so with the first pricing scheme. The researchers concluded that while the just-below price makes a product seem like a bargain, it also makes the step up to the premium product seem too expensive. “Going from $19.99 to $25 may seem like it will cost more than going from $20 to $26, even though it is actually less,” lead author doctoral student Junha Kim said in a statement. “Crossing that round number threshold makes a big difference for consumers.” Students in a lab study were also more likely to choose a costlier car or apartment options when base prices were just above round numbers, rather than just below. The study appears to indicate a shortcoming in the theory around charm pricing, or psychological pricing, that holds that goods priced using...
“T&C Surf Celebrates 50 Years in Business” by Tiffany Montgomery via Shop Eat Surf

“T&C Surf Celebrates 50 Years in Business” by Tiffany Montgomery via Shop Eat Surf

Please click on the following link to view this relevant Shop Eat Surf Article containing the history behind and the future ahead of T & C Surf (BRA Distinguished Retail Member): T&C Surf Celebrates 50 Years in Business” Be sure to visit the Shop Eat Surf website to view valuable Industry News and Resourceful Articles regularly via this link: Shop Eat Surf If you are not already a BRA Retail Member, you can easily opt in to either Regular (no cost) or Distinguished ($99/yr.) Membership via this super simple join...
“Take A Look at America’s Coolest Surf Shops – CELEBRATING SURFING’S MOST ICONIC WATERING HOLES” via Surfer Mag

“Take A Look at America’s Coolest Surf Shops – CELEBRATING SURFING’S MOST ICONIC WATERING HOLES” via Surfer Mag

There’s always been something special about surf shops. From the amalgamated scent of wax, new wetsuits and fresh boards to the intel on which local break is currently working best, where to get the best post-surf burrito in town and so much more, surf culture resides inside surf shops-that’s what makes them special. In our series Shop Chronicles, a web series we produced over the past couple of years, SURFER was able to share the stories of iconic surf shops that reside on both the east and west coasts. After nearly a year of surf shops having to weather the roller coaster of statewide shutdowns due to COVID, we decided to circle back around and celebrate these cultural watering holes. Keep scrolling to get a historical glimpse inside some of America’s most iconic surf shops. Harbour Surfboards Inside Harbour Surfboards None has a more storied local history than Harbour Surfboards, located in Seal Beach, California. The 60-year-old shop is rooted in the art of shaping high-quality surfboards, an ethos fostered by owner Rich Harbour, who crafted his first surfboard at the age of 16 in his parents’ garage. Since the opening of his eponymous enterprise in 1959, he and his team have created more than 32,000 boards. Rich Harbour might be best known for his open-door policy–giving a home to some of surfing’s greatest influences. Besides putting together an all-star surf team in the ’60s–which included Jock Sutherland, Corky Carroll, Bill Fury, Herbie Fletcher, Mark Martinson, Richard Chew and countless other legends–Harbour was best known for his hands-on approach and making his surf shop a place for everyone to hang at....
“LET’S TALK WITH CHRIS NIERATKO ABOUT SKATE SHOP DAY, THE EVOLUTION OF SKATE SHOPS, GIVING BACK TO THE COMMUNITY, THE OLYMPICS AND MORE” by Jordy via Good Day To Skateboards

“LET’S TALK WITH CHRIS NIERATKO ABOUT SKATE SHOP DAY, THE EVOLUTION OF SKATE SHOPS, GIVING BACK TO THE COMMUNITY, THE OLYMPICS AND MORE” by Jordy via Good Day To Skateboards

Chris Nieratko has been a big voice in skateboarding for more than twenty-five years. More recently, him and his friends started Skate Shop Day, which will be held on February 19th this year, for its second edition. We had the chance to talk with him to learn more about it, to discuss the evolution of skate shops, the importance of giving back to the community and more. Grab a drink, some snacks, and enjoy this very interesting interview. How did you come up with the idea of creating the Skate Shop Day in 2020? When did you first think about it? Truth be told, it’s not my idea entirely. My friend Scotty Coats, who works in the music industry, is a lifelong skater, and he was on the ground floor of Record Store Day which has been hugely successful. It’s pretty remarkable because they now have it twice a year, earlier in the year and then I think it’s the Friday after Thanksgiving. Scotty was telling me that these mom-and-pop record stores have a special day, they get exclusive and limited product. And in that day, they generate three to five months’ worth of rent, in one single day. I was blown away by that alone and he’s like, “We should do this for skate shops”. I absolutely fell in love with the idea and so that was last February, we thought of it on a Friday, and the following Thursday we launched a website and Instagram, thanks to artist Sasha Barr for lending us his, “Support your local skateshop” artwork. That first skate shop day I basically went through my cell...
“The Fin Box, Its History, and Why It Changed Surfing Forever” by Sam George via The Inertia

“The Fin Box, Its History, and Why It Changed Surfing Forever” by Sam George via The Inertia

Downing’s original inlaid wooden slot, and the modern box courtesy of Futures. Editor’s Note: Welcome to our new series, Ride This, where we look at innovations in the world of surfing and beyond that changed the pursuit forever. In this edition, Sam George looks at the fin box, where it came from, and how it’s become an intricate part of surfboard design and wave -riding progression.  The Fin Box A slot or plug that in the surfboard manufacturing process is laminated flush to the bottom section of the tail into which fins of various designs can easily be inserted and removed. Where’d it Come From? The history of the fin box begins, like so many other surfboard innovations, with the late George Downing of Hawaii. The youngest member of a crew of hardy big wave pioneers experimenting with the narrow-tailed, finless “Hot Curl” boards back in the 1940s, Downing was relentless in his press for greater performance. This led to the creation of the first modern big wave surfboard, a remarkably sophisticated balsa-wood pintail he shaped in 1951, dubbing it “The Rocket.” In terms of template and foil The Rocket was at least 30 years ahead of its time, yet the design leap most quantum was the inlaid wooden slot into which a fin could be wedged, allowing Downing for the first time to experiment with various shapes and positions. Ironically, this innovation ultimately slowed the development of the fin box: once Downing found the optimum positioning, and having by then adopted the use of fiberglass, he began glassing the fins on, pointing to increased torque against the base. This obvious advancement preceded...
“HOW TWO SHOPS ARE WORKING TOGETHER TO MAKE IT THROUGH THE PANDEMIC” by LARRY LANZA via JENKEM MAG

“HOW TWO SHOPS ARE WORKING TOGETHER TO MAKE IT THROUGH THE PANDEMIC” by LARRY LANZA via JENKEM MAG

It’s no secret that, prior to the pandemic, one of the greatest things about a skateshop was its fixture as a hub for the community, serving as a place to hang out, talk shit, and ask for a pivot cup or spare bearing or something. But with the shutdowns, shops have to find new ways to keep their local skaters and new customers hyped on the shop and invested in their survival.Gary Smith, the owner of Vù Skate Shop in Baltimore, and Ben Jones, owner of Kinetic Skate Shop in Wilmington, just 60-minutes apart from one another, recently released a shop collaboration deck and shirt. Two shops working together on a joint promotion is extremely rare in the skate biz, even though skaters will collab with just about anything. The ongoing pandemic has put skate shops in a weird place because, even though their storefronts are closed, they are still selling boards, more than ever before in some cases. There’s no set business model in place to weather a pandemic, but shops like Vù and Kinetic coming together to support one another gives one way forward for shops struggling to make it alone. This is one of the few times we’ve seen shops collaborate like this, where did the idea come from? Ben: Gary told me about this maybe three years ago. It was one of the coolest ideas I’ve ever heard. Especially since owning a skate shop has changed in the years that we’ve both been doing it. When we first started doing this, I feel like there were more rivalry between the shops. Now, we’re all friends and we’re all in the same fight together....