“Skate Shop Day” happens on Feb. 19th – FAQs & more

“Skate Shop Day” happens on Feb. 19th – FAQs & more

  What is Skate Shop Day? Skate Shop Day, like Record Store Day and Comic Book Store Day, is the day that the skateboard community celebrates our cultural hubs, the foundations of every skate scene, the places that bring skaters together and act as the glue for skateboarding as a whole. Go Skateboarding Day is meant to get skaters OUT skating. Skate Shop Day is meant to get skaters IN to the shops to show love to the unsung heros that do so much for skating the other 364 days of the year. We support skateshops every day but we celebrate them on February 19th. Who is behind Skate Shop Day? Two old friends who grew up 3,000 miles apart loving skateboarding and music and spending much of their formative youth dreaming of the world just past their town’s boarders thanks to the images were shared in the magazines found in their local shops, Surf Styles in Mission Viejo, CA and Ollie Pops, (Now called Pro Skateshop) in Howell, NJ. (Read Scotty’s story HERE.) Scotty pursued a life dedicated to music while Chris dedicated his to skateboarding, ultimately opening NJ Skateshop in 2003 with his two childhood friends, Steve Lenardo and Troy Jankowski. The most beautiful part is there is a collective of skate shop owners from all over the world that will help steer Skate Shop Day so that it can be as impactful and inspiring as possible. Where is Skate Shop Day heading? In 2020, Skate Shop Day was born. In 2021, it’ll start to take shape thanks to some to some very special projects from a number of...
“Evo is paving a new kind of future for outdoor retail” by Amelia Arveson via SNEWS

“Evo is paving a new kind of future for outdoor retail” by Amelia Arveson via SNEWS

Evo is paving a new kind of future for outdoor retail By investing in real estate, adventures, youth, and its fellow retailers, evo founder Bryce Phillips is building a cohesive and complete adventure community. by AMELIA ARVESEN  FEB 10, 2020 Evo’s story starts like many outdoor endeavors: Bryce Phillips as a college student was slinging ski gear out of his apartments in Seattle and Whistler in the ‘90s and launched the website evogear.com in 2001. The former professional skier’s startup business merged outdoor, fashion, culture, and community into a single lifestyle brand that has grown into a major player across many industries. And this year, the business comes full circle with the opening of multiple storefronts in Whistler Blackcomb Ski Resort’s village. Along with its large online presence, evo also has locations—better known as “experience and community centers”—in Seattle; Portland, Oregon; Denver, Colorado; and in the coming months, Salt Lake City. “It’s not a coincidence that we’re opening locations in places we all love to be,” Phillips said. Whenever we scout somewhere new, there’s always recreation woven into all of it. We don’t go to Utah and not get outside. We don’t go to any of these places and not have something baked into the calendar where we’re really getting a chance to go outside with coworkers, friends, and customers in those places.” Bryce Phillips, now 42 years old, founded evo as a typical online retailer when he was in college, but today the company defies labels, blending retail with food, lodging, and adventure experiences like bouldering and skateboarding. We’ve kept tabs on evo for years now and we finally called Phillips...
Register for free webinar – Retail Outlook: Improve, Engagement, Profit, and Sustainability with Analytics (Feb 25th)

Register for free webinar – Retail Outlook: Improve, Engagement, Profit, and Sustainability with Analytics (Feb 25th)

As the retail industry rapidly changes, a company’s ability to exceed customer expectations—from browsing experiences to delivery—continues to determine profit and sustainability. Join us for a webcast to learn how successful retailers are using advanced data to create a focused view of their customers. In this session, we’ll cover key trends in the retail industry for 2020 and ways your company can leverage these trends to enhance customer experience and stay competitive. START TIME: February 25, 2020 10:00 AM PST DURATION: 1 hour LOCATION: Online CONTACT: Marci Reynolds, Moss Adams, 916-503-8206 COST TO ATTEND: Complimentary Please click on the following link to register for this complementary webinar via this link: Retail Outlook: Improve Engagement, Profit, and Sustainability with Analytics Improve Engagement, Profit, and Sustainability with...
“Thoughts from Outdoor Retailer / Snow Show” by Jeff Harbaugh

“Thoughts from Outdoor Retailer / Snow Show” by Jeff Harbaugh

Thoughts from Outdoor Retailer/Snow Show February 6, 2020 in Market Watch Column, Trade Shows by Jeff Harbaugh The first thing you think when you walk into the show is what an incredibly great idea it was to consolidate The Snow Show with Outdoor Retailer.  The second thing you think is, “What took them so long?”  I imagine the answer to that is quite a soap opera. The next thing I thought was whether I’d gone to the dog show by mistake.  I like dogs, but the sheer number was rather remarkable this year. For the two days I was there, it was a vibrant and active show.  Not so sure about the third day, given the number of attendees who were on the Friday morning flight back to Seattle with me, but that’s what happens at trade show; the last day is typically slower. What the hell did we do when the show was even longer?   Oh, that’s right- we were younger and it was a lot more fun.  It was amusing when the people who were supposed to show up first thing in the morning didn’t make it till noon because they’d been out “networking” all night.  Somehow, it made you credible. Before the world (inconveniently) changed on us, shows focused on retailers writing orders and brands “getting paper,” whatever that is, from them.  Now, as a show veteran pointed out to me, buyers want to get on their computers, put orders from all their brands into their systems, and see how things look over all before finalizing orders given their sell through and new brands they may have discovered. Which is how...
A Talk with Ron Jon Leaders at New Disney Springs Store

A Talk with Ron Jon Leaders at New Disney Springs Store

Please click on the following link to view this excellent Shop Eat Surf Article: A Talk with Ron Jon Leaders at New Disney Springs Store Please note that this particular article is a Shop Eat Surf Executive Edition article so you will need to sign up and pay for access before viewing. We, at BRA,  feel that the benefits of the Executive Edition Membership clearly outweigh the cost. Be sure to visit the Shop Eat Surf website to view valuable Industry News and Resourceful Articles regularly via this link: Shop Eat Surf...
“No Comply and the Austin Skate Community” via Parade

“No Comply and the Austin Skate Community” via Parade

No Comply and the Austin Skate Community Owner, Elias Bingham, talks of the importance of the local skate shop Posted by Neil Chester6 min read Wednesday, January 15, 2020 No Comply is a skate shop located in Austin, Texas. As with all great skate shops, community is everything for No Comply. Whether that’s the friendly and dedicated staff on hand to offer advice or simply shoot the shit about the latest goings on in skateboarding. There’s a steady stream of locals rolling through to lurk and grab a coffee before heading to the incredible outdoor skatepark located right behind the store. The owner, Elias Bingham, has created something special here. Can you tell us about being a sponsored skater, who you rode for, when and what made you stop pursuing that and eventually open a skate shop? First sponsor was Jukebox Skate Shop in NYC around 93/94. Then Balance Skateboards and a couple of others in the late 90’s till I ended up on Element flow for about 10 years. I rode for Vita shoes, then Ipath, Circuit Wheels was my first ad in 98ish. I also skated for Venture Trucks, Spitfire, FTC and Upper Playground. First pic in a mag was the contents page of Slap’s first year anniversary issue. My first interview was in Big Brother’s East Coast issue ‘95. I got a Thrasher cover in May 2001, and appeared in 411vm and TWS. Sponsors supported my life of skating and helped me to travel the world and connect with our international skateboarding familia. As far as pursuing skateboarding, I never thought of doing it as a career, it has been what I’ve done most of my life and...