“TEST YOUR INNER SKATE NERD WITH THIS NEW TRIVIA CARD GAME” by Alexis Castro via JENKEM MAG

“TEST YOUR INNER SKATE NERD WITH THIS NEW TRIVIA CARD GAME” by Alexis Castro via JENKEM MAG

photo: gordon eckler Skateboarders’ brains contain tons of factoids that matter very little in the “real world,” like who the first person to skate up a handrail was, or who invented the salad grind. We love to tease each other about who knows more about short-lived brands and pros who are now dust in the wind, and we wear that knowledge like a badge of honor. Now you can objectively fight over who the biggest skate nerd in your friend group is thanks to Gordon Eckler’s Skate Trivia card game.Gordon’s new game is published by Gingko Press, which has printed a lot of books about street culture, street art, and skating in the past. That means the game will likely make its way into proper book stores and fancy retailers, but thankfully it’ll also be available directly at your local skate shop. We asked Gordon about the process of producing and pitching the game, who his fact-checkers are, and how he was able to verify questions that are skate folklore. Do you think anyone finds having extensive knowledge of skate trivia to be a turn-on?[laughs] I’ve never been turned on by skate trivia. I think you’re thinking of the bar nights that are popular in places like Brooklyn. I’ve never been to one of those, so I can’t really say. Skate trivia nights are pretty popular in NYC, but they’re overrun by old white guys who only care about stuff from the ’90s or before. Is your game different?Very different. Early on when I was “road testing” the game with friends, I realized that if the trivia was all about one...
“Director Jacob Rosenberg Discusses His Early Work and the Impact of Skate Videos” by Anthony Pappalardo via ONE37pm

“Director Jacob Rosenberg Discusses His Early Work and the Impact of Skate Videos” by Anthony Pappalardo via ONE37pm

Portrait by Brett Simon Video content is the driver of modern skateboarding, but for being so integral, it’s a relatively young medium that’s still evolving. During the 1980s, Stacy Peralta saw the potential and power of video, creating a string of influential full-lengths for Powell Peralta—the company he co-owned with George Powell—starting with The Bones Brigade Video Show in 1984. But it wasn’t until the early-’90s with the advent of 411 Video Magazine in 1993 and brands releasing video projects en masse that a sea change of how skateboarding media was consumed began.  Filmmaker Jacob Rosenberg spent his teenage years behind the lens, documenting the burgeoning scene around him in Palo Alto, California, filming at skate camps, in the streets, and documenting the next wave of skateboarders who would shape modern skateboarding and change its trajectory forever.  Rosenberg’s passion caught the attention of Mike Ternasky in 1988, who was working with H-Street, a company whose profile was rising in skateboarding and ushering in a new approach and look. Ternasky would later found Plan B skateboards in 1991, a “superteam” whose video output set a new standard in skateboarding, birthing the format of the modern skateboarding video still emulated today. Unfortunately, Ternasky passed away in a car accident in 1994, altering the trajectory of Plan B and for Rosenberg, suddenly leaving him without a friend and mentor.  Rosenberg’s knack for not only capturing tricks but the mood and moments around them became a key part of skateboarding videography’s vocabulary, but as he told me, none of that was premeditated. For Rosenberg, he was a kid given the keys to the kingdom, and energy and...
“JENKEM PRESENTS: THE 5TH ANNUAL SKATEBOARDING SUPERLATIVES” by James Lee via JENKEM MAG

“JENKEM PRESENTS: THE 5TH ANNUAL SKATEBOARDING SUPERLATIVES” by James Lee via JENKEM MAG

The world may have exploded twice over in last year but we weren’t really paying attention because 2021 was a historic year for skateboarding. Not only was it the first time that our hobby/sport/whatever was showcased on a worldwide scale, but it was also the year Tony Hawk sold his blood and his tricks. We saw Supreme expand their empire to Italy and Germany, while brands like StockX entered the skateboarding zeitgeist.To properly highlight the good, the bad, and the even worse of 2021 we sat and thought about it for like 45 minutes and decided to come up with this list. There might be some awards on here that you don’t understand, but as long as you get a laugh and prepare for another year full of unfathomable trends, hard slams, and then we’ve done our job! Previous Winners: 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020. BEST SPONSOR The US Government SKATE EVENT OF THE YEAR Milk Crate Challenge LAMEST BEEF Kelly Hart vs. Rad Rat TEAM OF THE YEAR 917 BEST FLICK Louie Lopez WHEN WILL IT END? Big Boy trend 7TH PLACE Nyjah Huston PLEASE, NO Jagger Eaton WHERE’D THEY GO? Business and Company MOST “FOR ME IT’S CRAZY LIKE” Leticia Bufoni MOST DEAD END Straye Words: James LeeIllustration by: Michael GiuratoShare this with a winner on FacebookReport this as uncounted votes on Instagram or Twitter If you like fun and intelligent skateboarding related articles, be sure to visit and bookmark: Jenkem Mag If you are not yet a BRA Retail Member, you can easily opt in to either Regular (no cost) or Distinguished ($100/yr.) Membership via this super simple join...
“GROUND GLASS: MARK SUCIU” by James Thompson via Jenkem Mag

“GROUND GLASS: MARK SUCIU” by James Thompson via Jenkem Mag

2021 SOTY = Mark Suciu Everyone loves to say contests and awards don’t carry any weight in skateboarding, but every year, skaters seem to give a lot of weight to Thrasher’s Skater of the Year award. “SOTY Season” gives us a lot to debate about, like whether someone shotgunned enough beers in their b-roll clips, if their handrails had enough kinks in them, or if they even released enough footage to “really deserve it.” It all seems silly and trivial, but that’s the nature of this thing of ours that we all love to overthink. Now that the dust has settled, and all the congratulations and angry rants have been sent off into the void, I hope we can all agree there’s no denying Mark Suciu deserves his win. We’ve spent the year watching as he released a full-length’s worth of footage featuring marathon lines, multi-stair bangers, and a silly amount of handrail tricks. Our friend James Thomson spent a couple of days with Mark filming this 16mm edit for our “Ground Glass” series – Don’t think of this as yet another part of his “SOTY run,” but rather as a victory lap, and a showing of our appreciation for one of the best skaters of our generation. Intro by: Alexis CastroVideo by: James ThompsonShare this with a film freak on FacebookReport this as too analog on Instagram and Twitter If you like fun and intelligent skateboarding related articles, be sure to visit and bookmark: Jenkem Mag If you are not yet a BRA Retail Member, you can easily opt in to either Regular (no cost) or Distinguished ($100/yr.) Membership via this super simple join...
“Are skateboarders really solving the world’s problems, one trick at a time?” by David Wharton via Los Angeles Times

“Are skateboarders really solving the world’s problems, one trick at a time?” by David Wharton via Los Angeles Times

Members of the Aunt Skatie crew gather at the South Pasadena Skate Park on Nov. 14.(Brian van der Brug/Los Angeles Times) The women keep their distance. At first. Dressed in T-shirts and sneakers, skateboards in hand, they stand by a chain-link fence, talking, laughing, waiting to make their move. The Aunt Skatie crew, as they call themselves, has traveled east of downtown Los Angeles to convene just outside a community skate park outfitted with all manner of concrete stairs, banks and ledges for doing tricks. On a gray Sunday morning, they can see the space is filled mostly with guys. Killing a few minutes on an adjacent tennis court, the women ride in lazy circles as a portable speaker blasts rap music, its heavy beat mixing with the scuffle of urethane wheels. One of the men inside the park stops to peer through the fence at them; Maggie Bowen, the Aunt Skatie leader, is used to this. “Going into a skate park as a woman can be kind of intimidating,” she says. “Especially if you’re a beginner, guys look at you weird.” Their sport is not immune to cultural issues of race, gender and sexual orientation, but Bowen says “for women and queer people, it’s easier if you skate as a group.” And the increasing popularity of crews like hers has sociologists wondering if skaters might teach the rest of us something about inclusivity. The Tokyo Olympics helped show the world that skating is not just for white kids in the suburbs. People of color have risen to the highest levels of competition and the vibe is distinctly urban, fueled by hip-hop music...
“GROUND GLASS: BRAD CROMER” by James Thompson via Jenkem Mag

“GROUND GLASS: BRAD CROMER” by James Thompson via Jenkem Mag

Over the last few years we’ve seen a few videographers include 16mm film in their edits. While it’s common to see a couple of seconds of b-roll or a trick thrown in as an artsy break, very few attempt to capture an entire video on film. At $50 a minute, you’re at the mercy of high costs, old equipment and the consistency of skaters. James Thomson, an Australian videographer based out of New York was up for the challenge and wanted to spearhead a new segment capturing the timelessness of skating on film in 2021. Like a nod to an old Transworld montage, the crispness and warmth of film creates a sense of beauty that you get from mixing the archaic gear with a modern landscape, something digital footage of today doesn’t quite capture. There aren’t too many skaters who can land so many tricks this clean in just a few tries, so Brad was the perfect subject for a video where each moment captured costs a pretty penny. Kick back and get ready to watch some powerful, beautifully captured skating, and keep an eye out for more “Ground Glass” features from James on the site. Video by: James ThomsonShare this with a buff film buff on FacebookReport this as ABD on Instagram and Twitter If you like fun and intelligent skateboarding related articles, be sure to visit and bookmark: Jenkem Mag If you are not yet a BRA Retail Member, you can easily opt in to either Regular (no cost) or Distinguished ($100/yr.) Membership via this super simple join...