“No Comply and the Austin Skate Community” via Parade

“No Comply and the Austin Skate Community” via Parade

No Comply and the Austin Skate Community Owner, Elias Bingham, talks of the importance of the local skate shop Posted by Neil Chester6 min read Wednesday, January 15, 2020 No Comply is a skate shop located in Austin, Texas. As with all great skate shops, community is everything for No Comply. Whether that’s the friendly and dedicated staff on hand to offer advice or simply shoot the shit about the latest goings on in skateboarding. There’s a steady stream of locals rolling through to lurk and grab a coffee before heading to the incredible outdoor skatepark located right behind the store. The owner, Elias Bingham, has created something special here. Can you tell us about being a sponsored skater, who you rode for, when and what made you stop pursuing that and eventually open a skate shop? First sponsor was Jukebox Skate Shop in NYC around 93/94. Then Balance Skateboards and a couple of others in the late 90’s till I ended up on Element flow for about 10 years. I rode for Vita shoes, then Ipath, Circuit Wheels was my first ad in 98ish. I also skated for Venture Trucks, Spitfire, FTC and Upper Playground. First pic in a mag was the contents page of Slap’s first year anniversary issue. My first interview was in Big Brother’s East Coast issue ‘95. I got a Thrasher cover in May 2001, and appeared in 411vm and TWS. Sponsors supported my life of skating and helped me to travel the world and connect with our international skateboarding familia. As far as pursuing skateboarding, I never thought of doing it as a career, it has been what I’ve done most of my life and...
“Finland’s Finntastic Response To World Skate” by Dave Carnie via Transworld Skateboarding

“Finland’s Finntastic Response To World Skate” by Dave Carnie via Transworld Skateboarding

Finland’s Finntastic Response To World Skate January 9, 2020 By Dave Carnie The Finnish Skateboarding Association found a clever way to repel the roller derby junta’s invasion of their country’s skate scene. The International Olympic Committee (IOC) resolved the conflict between the International Skateboard Federation (ISF) and Rollersports regarding who would be skateboarding’s official international governing body by combining the two disparate organizations into one now known as World Skate. The compromise reached was that Olympic Skateboarding would be handled 50/50: ISF, the skateboarding contingent (comprised of core members of the skateboard industry and helmed by Woodward’s Gary Ream), would handle everything that involves skateboarding, from running the contests, to course design, to drawing up rules, etc., while the Rollersports people would handle the logistics and the “business” of Olympic Skateboarding. As I expected, that is not how things are playing out. For one, World Skate is helmed by members of the former Rollersports organization, a group dedicated to roller skating and rollerblading. Skateboarding is merely one of many disciplines under the World Skate umbrella. While Skateboarding is governed by respected members of the skateboard community, it is still, ultimately, only a division of World Skate. The former Rollersports officials have shown both in attitude and action thus far that they very much intend to assert their dominance over their new Skateboarding division and milk it for all its worth because it’s the first time they’ve “owned” anything worthy of being called an Olympic sport. As one anonymous source told me, “World Skate is the worst organization I’ve ever experienced. Coupled with arrogance and inexperience, they believe they are the best...
“Danny Way Talks Olympics and Absence Of The Mega” by Mackenzie Eisenhour via Transworld Skateboarding

“Danny Way Talks Olympics and Absence Of The Mega” by Mackenzie Eisenhour via Transworld Skateboarding

Danny Way Talks Olympics And Absence Of The Mega December 20, 2019 By Mackenzie Eisenhour  This is part 3 of my ongoing conversations about the upcoming Olympics (Read Part 1 with Josh Friedberg here and Part 2 with Tony Hawk here). Skateboarding being in the Olympics is a funny thing. Everybody has an opinion on something that has never happened. I would chalk that up to how much each and every one of us loves skateboarding as it is—pre-Olympics—and our fears, real or imagined that being a part of the biggest sports event on the planet might change that. For this installment, I checked in with Danny Way—on the eve of him celebrating 30 years of professional skateboarding—to get his two cents on how he thinks Tokyo 2020 will affect the broader culture and specifically the counterculture of skateboarding. I also asked him—as arguably the founder of the Mega Ramp—what his response was to the absence of one at Tokyo next year. And finally, as a company owner (of Plan B and with deep ties to DC Shoes) I wanted to know how Way felt about Nike’s outsized role next year dressing the skaters from Team USA and beyond. Here were his responses. Photo Credit: Mike Blabac Danny at the Great Wall of China, 2005. What are your thoughts on skateboarding joining the Olympics in general? You know, It’s cool that skateboarding has gotten that validation—that it has matured to that level. It’s cool to see—it’s been around for a long time and it’s paid a lot of dues to sort of get to this point of mainstream recognition and finally being accepted. On...
“SURF EXPO MINI RAMP JAM, Skaters compete for cash and prizes!” via SurfExpo.com

“SURF EXPO MINI RAMP JAM, Skaters compete for cash and prizes!” via SurfExpo.com

SURF EXPO MINI RAMP JAM Skaters compete for cash and prizes! All I Need Skate & World Industries will be hosting an EPIC Game of Skate & Mini Ramp Jam at Surf Expo.  Judges will include legendary pro’s Anthony Shetler and Florida’s own Timmy Knuth as well as rookie pro’s Evan Mansolillo, Kevin Klemme & Billy Drowne. Come shred the ramp & meet some pro’s while possibly winning some prizes! Does your shop want to compete? Click here to apply.  Hosted by: All I Need Skate and World Industries  Schedule: Wednesday, Jan. 8: Mini Ramp Jam Practice/Registration @ Noon, Game of Skate @ 1 pm Thursday, Jan. 9: BRA Battle of the Shop Bosses from 9am to 11am Mini Ramp Jam Practice/Registration @ 9 am, Mini Ramp Jam @ 10 am Friday, Jan.10: Open Ramp   Legendary Pros: Anthony Shetler  Timmy Knuth Rookie Pros: Evan Mansolillo  Kevin Klemme  Billy Drowne Skate Ramp by Goat Ramp  The ramp is 40’ long and 32’ wide, with various heights between 5′, 7′ and 8’. Art by Peter James Glenn  Exhibitor List Floor Plan JANUARY 8-10, 2020 Wednesday – Friday ORANGE COUNTY CONVENTION CENTER N/S CONCOURSE • ORLANDO,...
“BRA Regional Retailer Roundtable Highlight Reel (SHACC Nov 2019)” filmed and edited by Noah Schuler

“BRA Regional Retailer Roundtable Highlight Reel (SHACC Nov 2019)” filmed and edited by Noah Schuler

Such an outstanding event.  Massive thanks to the Distinguished Panel and Supporting Event Partners including Surfing Heritage and Culture Center, Locally, Solite Boots, Action Watch, Exchange Collective and Sambazon as well as all of the Retailers, Brands and Vendors that attended this outstanding Regional Retailer Roundtable Event.  Check out the Highlight Reel by clicking below.  Filmed and Edited by Noah Schuler. The next BRA Regional Roundtable will happen at Surf Expo in the Learning Lounge on January 9, 2020 at 4 pm.    For additional details on this and other upcoming BRA events, click:...
“Jon Comer, Pioneer of Adaptive Skateboarding, dies at age 43” via ESPN (X-Games.com)

“Jon Comer, Pioneer of Adaptive Skateboarding, dies at age 43” via ESPN (X-Games.com)

ESPN Images Considered the godfather of adaptive skateboarding, Jon Comer’s influence on skateboarding transcended boundaries and pushed the awareness of adaptive skating to the forefront. Jon Comer, the first pro skateboarder with a prosthetic leg, died on Thursday, Dec. 5 at age 43. Comer turned pro in the mid-1990s and won fans around the world with his vert and concrete skatepark videos, including a full part in the 1999 Powell video ‘Magic,’ inspiring a generation of athletes with disabilities to take up skateboarding and other action sports. “It goes without saying: Jon Comer was the godfather of adaptive skateboarding,” says Daniel Gale, the sport organizer for adaptive sports at X Games including the Adaptive Skateboard Park event that debuted as a medal event at X Games Minneapolis 2019. “A lot of skaters seeing his videos and photos in magazines in the ’90s didn’t even immediately notice the prosthetic leg. The stuff that he was doing on vert ramps on a prosthetic leg when nobody else was, was as good as just about any other pro skateboarder at the time.” Comer injured his right foot in a car accident when he was four years old, and had it amputated several years later, at age 7. It didn’t stop him from taking up skateboarding at age 12. The 2004 documentary ‘Never Been Done: The Jon Comer Story,’ directed by Matthew J. Powers, chronicles his life and skateboarding career and won awards that year at the San Diego Film Festival, Houston International Film Festival, Tiburon International Film Festival, and the X-Dance Film Festival. Comer was humble about his accomplishments when interviewed for...