“THE INS AND OUTS OF DECK COLLECTING” by Ian Michna via JENKEM MAG

“THE INS AND OUTS OF DECK COLLECTING” by Ian Michna via JENKEM MAG

Collecting skateboards is a pain in the ass. Boards are heavy, you need a lot of space to store them, and they will happily catch fire if your house ever burns to the ground. But that hasn’t stopped a small group of hardcore collectors who have spent thousands of dollars and countless hours finding and preserving iconic boards from the past. We’re not talking about your average skater who has a couple of old scratched-up decks lying around in the garage, we’re talking about the big fish – the guys who could put a downpayment on a house if they were to liquidate their collections. As we have very little experience ourselves collecting decks at that level, we hit up three collectors to learn the basics and how they found themselves deep down the rabbit hole. If you ever wanted to reclaim a piece of your childhood and cop that elusive Muska deck or Think board you saw in a CCS catalog, hopefully, this guide will be a solid place to start. Happy Hunting! DAVE SKOOT How long have you been collecting, and how much have you spent on decks so far?I’ve been collecting seriously now for the last six years, but my love for certain graphics started when I first started skating. I don’t really like to talk about money but hey, this is Jenkem, right? So let’s just say I have over 600 boards. Most of them are worth over $400, some a $1000, and I didn’t pay anything close to that for any of them. Also being single with no kids at 42 allows me to...
“16 THINGS YOU DIDN’T KNOW ABOUT TRUCKS” by Christian Senrud via JENKEM MAG

“16 THINGS YOU DIDN’T KNOW ABOUT TRUCKS” by Christian Senrud via JENKEM MAG

For as long as I have been skateboarding, there have been so many debates over which trucks turn the fastest, which trucks grind the best, and which trucks last the longest. Each brand has their own specialty, and there’s no telling which trucks are truly “the best,” (although there are some that can be definitely be considered the worst). To get more familiar with the history and intricacies of these old metal contraptions, we put together a list of truck facts that you may not have known or even cared to think about. Hopefully, something is useful here, or at the very least, will help you the next time you play skate trivia. 1. THE SHOP THAT SOLD THE FIRST PAIRS OF TRUCKS IS STILL IN BUSINESS In 1962 Val Surf in Los Angeles was the first shop to sell trucks with the intent to use them on a skateboard. Ordering trucks and wheels from a roller skate company, they would put together DIY boards with help from students at the local high school. 2. THE RIVALRY BETWEEN THRASHER AND TRANSWORLD IS BASED ON TRUCKS In 1981, Fausto Vitello, one of the owners of Independent Trucks, founded Thrasher Magazine as a way to promote Independent and other brands. Two years later, Larry Balma, owner of Tracker Trucks, followed suit and launched Transworld Magazine. The two magazines had different views on skating, (“Skate and Destroy” [Thrasher] vs. “Skate and Create” [Transworld]) but were both created to promote their respective truck companies. 3. THE WORD “TRUCK” DATES BACK 1800 YEARS Short for “truckle,” which is a “small wheel or roller,” the word truck is derived from the Latin...
“PALATE CLEANSER: MAKIES SKATESHOP – A Book of ’80s Skate Shop Photographs by Francis Makiej” by Anthony Pappalardo via Artless Industria

“PALATE CLEANSER: MAKIES SKATESHOP – A Book of ’80s Skate Shop Photographs by Francis Makiej” by Anthony Pappalardo via Artless Industria

PHOTOS BY FRANCIS MAKIEJ SPOILER ALERT: I Made a Book/Zine Facebook sucks. (Full stop). If I were to think of something valuable about the platform or “product” as some call it, I wouldn’t try to kid you with claims about “connecting the world” or “providing a space for people to share ideas.” Nah. It’s not that. If I collected things, I might say Facebook Marketplace is kind of great but I rarely use Zuck’s creation. However, several years ago a page appeared with the images above, along with a grip of other equally stunning, weird, cool, and innocent photos of kids and their (mostly) new skateboard decks. I may not be a collector but I’m a digital hoarder so I downloaded them all, contacted said admin, and waited. The photos are from a shop called Mackies Skateboards and Bicycle Shop but for the skate of brevity, we’re going to refer to it as Mackies Skateboards. Notice there’s no apostrophe? That’s how it was written back in the ‘80s and I’m going to honor that. Mackies was located in Lowell, Massachusetts. I went there once. All I remember was that they had a great board wall and low ceilings. I don’t remember who told us that Lowell was a great city to ride skateboards in but it was, so one Saturday we convinced an older cat to drive us there and he did. That’s huge. He even took us to RRR Records and I bought a Uniform Choice cassette for $3.99 (the good one). Anyway, we were skating some stairs and I broke my board. One of the members of...
“A VISUAL GUIDE TO SKATING CARS” by Larry Lanza via Jenkem Mag

“A VISUAL GUIDE TO SKATING CARS” by Larry Lanza via Jenkem Mag

According to a stat I just made up, there are about one billion cars currently in circulation across the globe. Yeah, cars are a leading cause of global warming and an insane amount of deaths, but they offer endless possibilities for the people who own them. Besides just driving them to your shitty job, you can soup them up Mad Max style, get laid in the backseat, and of course, use them to get an unforgettable clip. Skating on cars is definitely not a new trend. In fact, Natas was doing it 25 years before I could legally drive. Since then the tricks have gone to new heights, just like gas prices, and there have even been entire videos dedicated to skating cars. So in honor of the pioneers of car shredding, we sifted through tons of footage to pick out some of our favorite car clips to share with you. Before you ask, no, this post isn’t sponsored by Toyota like all the US Olympic athletes are. But if anyone from Toyota happens to be reading this, if you give me a free Tacoma, I’ll be sure to skate the bed of the truck and post it to the ‘gram. NATAS KAUPAS – STREETS ON FIRE [1989] Like most things in street skating, Natas is the true trendsetter when it comes to skating on cars. This boardslide in Streets on Fire is likely one of the reasons a ton of contests in the early ‘90s had a random car in the middle of the course. Thankfully, the whole high tops with high socks thing Natas was pushing here was a trend that was lost to time....
“16 THINGS YOU DIDN’T KNOW ABOUT PROFESSIONAL SKATEBOARDING” by Christian Senrud and Staff via Jenkem Mag

“16 THINGS YOU DIDN’T KNOW ABOUT PROFESSIONAL SKATEBOARDING” by Christian Senrud and Staff via Jenkem Mag

Skateboarding is so damn fun that it’s easy to forget it’s also an actual j-o-b that some people do to make ends meet. Just like the regular jobs you and I work, there are a lot of nuances, expectations, and obligations that the greater world doesn’t necessarily know about. We got curious about what some of those things might be, so we dug into our contact list of industry heads—who will remain unnamed—to get some insight from people who are truly in the know. If you’re a SLAP head, you might know most of this stuff already because you bastards seem to know everything. For the rest of you, hopefully, you’ll come out of this learning a thing or two, because we certainly did. 1. PROS MAKE MORE MONEY FROM ONLINE BOARD SALES THAN SHOP SALES Depending on the board brand or distribution, some pros can make as much as a $10 per board if you buy it directly from their sponsor’s website. The riders still make money from skate shop sales as well, but online is where they get the biggest chunk because it essentially cuts out the middleman and has a bigger profit margin. 2. PROFESSIONAL SKATEBOARDERS DON’T ALWAYS OWN THE RIGHTS TO THEIR FOOTAGE As Roger Bagley puts it, that’s “The person who hit record, or the person paying the person to hit record.” Given the buddy-buddy nature of the skate industry, this generally works, but it is far from beyond its downsides. This practice has definitely led to the occasional hostage situation where a filmer won’t give up a footage until they feel they’ve been compensated fairly....
“HOW BROOKLYN GOT ITS OWN EUROPEAN STYLE SKATE SPACE” by Kenny via Jenkem Mag

“HOW BROOKLYN GOT ITS OWN EUROPEAN STYLE SKATE SPACE” by Kenny via Jenkem Mag

You might have seen footage floating around Instagram of a giant new skate spot somewhere in the middle of New York. Known officially as Under the K Bridge Park, this new hotspot is tucked away next to a recycling center and bus yard in the middle of Northern Brooklyn. On the surface, it may seem like just another public city park that’s been taken over by skaters, like Tompkins or TF West, but there is something different about this particular space. K Bridge Park is an anomaly because it breaks a lot of norms we’ve come to expect for newly built public spaces in New York. For one, it’s massive, spanning seven acres, and it’s filled with a ton of skate-friendly obstacles. The ledges and stairs have coping on them and nobody is batting an eye at the dropped-off ramps, rails, or skaters who are there every day. So is it a city park, a proper skatepark, or something else entirely? Should we be worried about an eventual crackdown, or is it actually being used exactly as it was intended? After talking with a few people behind the scenes, we got the story behind the park and what the greater plans are for Brooklyn’s newest spot. To clarify, K Bridge Park is designated as an “open public space,” not an official NYC skatepark, although it has skateable ledges—complete with steel coping—and handrails that are naturally built-in to make the park skate friendly. That means no one’s coming through to knob the ledges or rails here any time soon. It’s actually not even run by the city and is managed by a nonprofit group called the...