“The Tony Hawk Foundation Is Now THE SKATEPARK PROJECT” by TWS

“The Tony Hawk Foundation Is Now THE SKATEPARK PROJECT” by TWS

The Tony Hawk Foundation has announced a change in name, but not in focus. Now known as The Skatepark Project, the organization continues its award-winning work to support community skatepark projects across the U.S., and skatepark-based programming internationally.ADVERTISING Its mission is to help underserved communities create safe and inclusive public skateparks for youth. The Skatepark Project envisions thriving, healthy and sustainable communities throughout the United States in which young people have equitable access to safe outdoor spaces for creative expression, physical activity and a sense of belonging. Head to skatepark.org to learn more about how to support public skateparks through The Skatepark Project or get help with your local public skatepark advocacy project. L to R: Leticia Bufoni, Tony Hawk, Thalente Biyela, Jack Black, Sky Brown, Eric Koston, Samarria Brevard, Cher Strauberry, Killer Mike, Lizzie Armanto Transworld Skateboarding is an excellent source of skateboarding news and related content. Be sure to bookmark: https://skateboarding.transworld.net/ If you are not yet a BRA Retail Member, you can easily opt in to either Regular (no cost) or Distinguished ($99/yr.) Membership via this super simple join...
“WHAT YOUR GRIPTAPE STYLE SAYS ABOUT YOU” by MAX OLIJNYK via Jenkem Mag

“WHAT YOUR GRIPTAPE STYLE SAYS ABOUT YOU” by MAX OLIJNYK via Jenkem Mag

If you’re anything like me, you’re itching to skate that shiny new board you impulse-bought online. And with every new board comes the question: how should I grip it? With all this spare time on your hands, you should set aside an hour or so to do something special, right? Personally, I’ve been considering subscribing to the Dan Drehobl method. My reasoning? Firstly, he’s arguably the most enjoyable skateboarder on earth to watch. It varies from board to board, but Dan’s grip seems to follow a common ratio or coded pattern. It’s unclear whether it serves a practical purpose (foot placement guidance, perhaps?); perhaps it began as a way to ration out a sheet of grip on wider boards, or maybe it goes much deeper than that. Knowing Dan Drehobl (I don’t know him), it probably doesn’t mean shit. The whole thing got me thinking about grip jobs, and how all of that stuff matters, even if we pretend it doesn’t. Here’s my analysis of a few key approaches. PS. I realize I’m going crazy. THE SPEED STRIPE A cult favorite amongst the progressive crowd, the speed stripe (a vertical stripe running down the center of the board) tips its hat to skateboarding’s surfing lineage while thumbing its nose to the normies. “Stripers” can do every trick, but prefer to try weird combinations of things that look easy but actually aren’t – or are they? It’s all a big joke, anyway. And if you think it looks wack, the joke’s on you. Home turf: A spot that isn’t really a spotSoundtrack: Pop punk party hits of the ’90sBoard brands: Frog, WKNDKey offenders: Jesse Alba, Austyn Gillette THE ENDORSEE There’s...
“Global Skateboard Sales Surge Outstrips Supply” by Tiffany Montgomery via Shop Eat Surf (Executive Edition)

“Global Skateboard Sales Surge Outstrips Supply” by Tiffany Montgomery via Shop Eat Surf (Executive Edition)

Please click on the following link to view this relevant Shop Eat Surf Article:   Global Skateboard Sales Surge Outstrips Supply Please note that this article is a Shop Eat Surf Executive Edition article so you will need to sign up and pay for access before viewing. We, at BRA,  feel that the benefits of the SES Executive Edition Membership outweigh the cost. Be sure to visit the Shop Eat Surf website to view valuable Industry News and Resourceful Articles regularly via this link: Shop Eat Surf If you are not yet a BRA Retail Member, you can easily opt in to either Regular (no cost) or Distinguished ($99/yr.) Membership via this super simple join...
“Rolling For Rights Recap | San Diego” photos by Blair Allie and Jaime Owens via Transworld Skateboarding

“Rolling For Rights Recap | San Diego” photos by Blair Allie and Jaime Owens via Transworld Skateboarding

Wow! First and foremost I want to give a major shout out to everyone involved in making this possible: Tyrone Olson, Shuriken Shannon, Brandon Turner, Alfonso Huey, Zack Dowdy, Khalid Alexander, Xpress it, and the San Diego skateboard community. What a great success! We came together to spread our messages and bring awareness to the issues that have needed attention for far too long: Racism, white supremacy, police reform, police brutality, equality, human rights and justice for all! We had an amazing turn out and we couldn’t be more grateful to everyone for keeping it peaceful and organized. Huge thank you to all that donated and to all of our volunteers, on the frontlines or in the background. Without everyone’s help and cooperation none of this would have been possible. Once again to the San Diego skateboard community, this is just the beginning, we have a lot of work to do. Let’s educate ourselves on every platform in order to attack the issues at hand and be able to make an effective change that will last for generations to come.—Tommy Sandoval The Rolling for Rights movement event we were all a part of in San Diego was epic to say the least. I believe we got our message across as skateboarders representing our city for the Black Lives Matter movement and justice for all. SD showed up for a peaceful protest with no violence and no vandalism. I’d like to thank everyone who was able to make it out to hear our stories and voices to unite as one. This doesn’t end here… One love.—Brandon Turner A day to...
“HOW TWO SHOPS ARE WORKING TOGETHER TO MAKE IT THROUGH THE PANDEMIC” by LARRY LANZA via JENKEM MAG

“HOW TWO SHOPS ARE WORKING TOGETHER TO MAKE IT THROUGH THE PANDEMIC” by LARRY LANZA via JENKEM MAG

It’s no secret that, prior to the pandemic, one of the greatest things about a skateshop was its fixture as a hub for the community, serving as a place to hang out, talk shit, and ask for a pivot cup or spare bearing or something. But with the shutdowns, shops have to find new ways to keep their local skaters and new customers hyped on the shop and invested in their survival.Gary Smith, the owner of Vù Skate Shop in Baltimore, and Ben Jones, owner of Kinetic Skate Shop in Wilmington, just 60-minutes apart from one another, recently released a shop collaboration deck and shirt. Two shops working together on a joint promotion is extremely rare in the skate biz, even though skaters will collab with just about anything. The ongoing pandemic has put skate shops in a weird place because, even though their storefronts are closed, they are still selling boards, more than ever before in some cases. There’s no set business model in place to weather a pandemic, but shops like Vù and Kinetic coming together to support one another gives one way forward for shops struggling to make it alone. This is one of the few times we’ve seen shops collaborate like this, where did the idea come from? Ben: Gary told me about this maybe three years ago. It was one of the coolest ideas I’ve ever heard. Especially since owning a skate shop has changed in the years that we’ve both been doing it. When we first started doing this, I feel like there were more rivalry between the shops. Now, we’re all friends and we’re all in the same fight together....
“Skateparks Filled With Sand, So What, Shut Up And Skate – Venice and San Clemente skateparks get filled in with sand, here’s why it’s okay” by Jaime Owens via Transworld Skateboarding

“Skateparks Filled With Sand, So What, Shut Up And Skate – Venice and San Clemente skateparks get filled in with sand, here’s why it’s okay” by Jaime Owens via Transworld Skateboarding

When videos of the San Clemente and Venice, CA skateparks getting filled with sand went viral last week, many in the skateboarding population and beyond had real negative reactions – the outrage was fast, extreme, and polarizing. There was a lot of online screaming about personal freedom being take away. There was even a line of screaming about sand damaging the parks. The parks. Which are made of concrete. Being damaged by sand. For those of you who were up in arms about this, I’m here to tell you: everything’s gonna be fine, just fine. The parks were filled in because skaters weren’t obeying local ordinances mandating social distancing or respecting the clearly posted “No Trespassing” signs. Was it an extreme measure? Yes. Was it warranted? Probably, because what skater do you know who respects “No Trespassing” signs? I surely have skated right past my fair share or thousands. Having your local skatepark filled with sand is a bummer, I feel you, particularly when you have no clue when it’s going to get cleaned out. But the moral of the story is,  I don’t really give a shit and neither should you. San Clemente is my local park, and I want to skate it as badly as all the skaters who freaked out about the sand, but it’s still there. They didn’t bulldoze the damn thing, and one of these days it’ll be skateable again (no, Johnny, sand can’t hurt the concrete). But, more importantly, when did we let our skateboarding get regulated by whether some skatepark is open or not? There’s so much other shit to go skate, and...