“SKATEBOARDING IS A SPORT, SO NOW WHAT? – I Watched the Olympics and It Wasn’t What I Expected.” by Anthony Pappalardo via Artless Industrial

“SKATEBOARDING IS A SPORT, SO NOW WHAT? – I Watched the Olympics and It Wasn’t What I Expected.” by Anthony Pappalardo via Artless Industrial

After being announced in 2016 and delayed a year due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, skateboarding made its official Olympic debut on Saturday, July 24, 2021. During the ramp-up, my skate-centric social media channels fell into three buckets: 1. Supportive 2. Dismissive 3. Ironically excited. I mostly landed in the third lane because I seldom enjoy modern skate competitions but was curious and also happy for all those involved, especially the athletes. It seemed like the opinion that skateboarding was not a sport and this inclusion was a bad thing was the minority take, mostly because it’s a jaded way to view things and we all need to be celebratory on social media… right? Also, skateboarding is a sport and a physical art at the same time and it’s malleable—you can skate in a contest but also film a VX part and be revered by the “core” community.  If you’re an older person, you’ve seen different waves in skateboarding’s mainstream popularity so the Olympics? Is it really going to change that much and does it really matter?  Think about the notable “big money eras,” such as the X-Games Tony Hawk 900 boom and later, the Tony Hawk Pro Skater video game boom. Both changed skateboarding by making it more monetarily viable while normalizing it to normies. Woodward Skate Camp enrollment grew due to the interest, there was more mainstream coverage and one could argue that board graphics and branding became safer and more homogenized once big-box stores started carrying “real” brands.  We’ve been here before and that’s why most skaters don’t really care about what the Olympics will do...
“Teenagers Win All 3 Medals In Women’s Street Skateboarding Event” by Leila Fadel via NPR

“Teenagers Win All 3 Medals In Women’s Street Skateboarding Event” by Leila Fadel via NPR

Momiji Nishiya of Team Japan celebrates during the Women’s Street Final on day three of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games on Monday at Ariake Urban Sports Park. Patrick Smith/Getty Images TOKYO — Thirteen-year-old Momiji Nishiya dazzled during the Olympic women’s skateboarding street competition. She skated through a park of rails, ramps and stairs meant to mimic city street parks at the Ariake Urban Sports Park. When she finished, she became Japan’s youngest-ever gold medal winner and one of the youngest Olympic champions of all time. Nishiya shared the podium with two other teenagers. It “could very well be the youngest Olympic podium ever,” the official Olympics news outlet says. Nishiya’s win also sealed Japan’s domination of the street competition. It debuted at these Summer Olympics and organizers hope it infuses the global sports event with youthful energy. In fact, half of the women in the eight-skateboarder final were 16 or younger. Brazil’s Rayssa Leal, a few months younger than Nishiya, took silver. Another Japanese skateboarder Funa Nakayama, 16, won bronze. Nishiya’s victory came the day after Japan’s Yuto Horigome, 22, took the gold in the men’s street competition. The sport is one of several new games at the Olympics this year including surfing, three on three basketball and rock climbing. NPR is an independent, nonprofit media organization that was founded on a mission to create a more informed public. Every day, NPR connects with millions of Americans on the air, online, and in person to explore the news, ideas, and what it means to be human. Through its network of member stations, NPR makes local stories national, national stories local, and global...
“A Son of Tokyo Wins Skateboarding’s First Gold” by John Branch via The New York Times plus highlight video of the finals courtesy of NBC Sports

“A Son of Tokyo Wins Skateboarding’s First Gold” by John Branch via The New York Times plus highlight video of the finals courtesy of NBC Sports

Yuto Horigome of Japan landed three tricks in a row to claim his gold medal. Credit…Alexandra Garcia/The New York Times Yuto Horigome won gold in the men’s street competition only eight miles from where he grew up, and after Nyjah Huston fell four times in a row. TOKYO — With its street-riding roots, youthful vibe and full immersion into culture of all kinds, skateboarding was invited to the Olympics because its global reach could no longer be denied. But it only had to look across town for its first Olympic champion. Yuto Horigome, the 22-year-old son of a Tokyo taxi driver, had the gold medal for men’s street skateboarding draped around his neck on Sunday in an empty, sun-drenched skatepark about eight miles from where he grew up. Skateboarding: Men’s Street FinalRESULTGOLDYuto Horigome – Japan 37.18 ptsSILVERKelvin Hoefler – Brazil36.15 ptsBRONZEJagger Eaton – United States35.35 pts4Vincent Milou – France34.14 pts5Angelo Caro Narvaez – Peru32.87 pts6Aurelien  Giraud – France29.09 pts7Nyjah Huston – United States26.1 pts8Gustavo Ribeiro – Portugal15.05 pts With the venue’s grandstands left empty because of pandemic protocols, the biggest ovation he received was from the army of volunteers working at Ariake Urban Sports Park, who trailed him with enthusiastic applause. But the victory was sure to resonate. A few miles away, Horigome’s father, Ryota, the one who first taught Yuto how to ride, was too nervous to watch, even on television. He left the family’s third-floor apartment in an unassuming eastside neighborhood and went for a bicycle ride. Eventually, calls and messages poured into his phone. He knew what it meant. Yuto had won. And Japan, where skateboarding in...
“Kellen James and Jamie Palmore (KJP) | Hickman” via Transworld Skateboarding

“Kellen James and Jamie Palmore (KJP) | Hickman” via Transworld Skateboarding

Kellen James (owner of Arts and Rec Skate Shop) and Jamie Palmore come together for the first (and hopefully not the only) installment of the KJP (KJ + JP = KJP) series. First spot: Hickman. Guest appearances by:Jimmy Cao, Kyong Kim, Joe Blas, Marshall Heath, Chris LaRue, Adam Sullivan, and Mike Fitzgerald. Film and edit: Matthew Reyes Transworld Skateboarding is an excellent source of skateboarding news and related content. Be sure to bookmark: https://skateboarding.transworld.net/ If you are not yet a BRA Retail Member, you can easily opt in to either Regular (no cost) or Distinguished ($99/yr.) Membership via this super simple join...
“Facebook rides into Tokyo Games with new skateboarding campaign” by Kendra Clark via The Drum

“Facebook rides into Tokyo Games with new skateboarding campaign” by Kendra Clark via The Drum

Just four days before the official kick-off of the Tokyo Summer Olympics, Facebook has launched a new global ad campaign that showcases stories of how Facebook communities and technologies have helped bring together passionate skateboarders and skateboarding fans from across the globe — and advanced the sport itself. Facebook has today unveiled a new multichannel global ad campaign that aims to help people “change the game” with its platform and technologies. To run during NBC’s coverage of the 2021 Olympic Games in Tokyo, the spot celebrates Facebook’s vibrant skateboarding communities. This is the first year that skateboarding will be included in the Olympic Games. Brought to life by agency Droga5, the multi-app campaign includes creative for Facebook, Instagram, Facebook Blue App and Oculus. There are a total of four films, including one directed by pop-R&B icon FKA Twigs. “Facebook is proud to celebrate skateboarding and its athletes around the world, as the sport takes the global stage in Tokyo for the first time,” said Andrew Stirk, Facebook’s vice president of global company marketing, in a statement today. “Skateboarding is a grassroots sport and culture, centered around connection and community. This work celebrates the authentic stories of skaters using our platforms to find each other, broaden the culture, and push the sport forward.” Skateboarders and skateboarding fans have a notable presence across Facebook platforms. More than 34 million users follow skateboarding creators on Instagram, while Facebook is home to skateboarding groups and communities with over 5.7 million users. Ahead of the summer Olympics — which represents a major milestone for the sport — Facebook recognizes an opportunity to engage these...
“Gui Khury outshines Tony Hawk, lands 1080 to win X Games gold” via ESPN and USA Today

“Gui Khury outshines Tony Hawk, lands 1080 to win X Games gold” via ESPN and USA Today

Push play to view the 1080 degree spinning that earned 12 year old Gui Khury X-Games Gold ESPN Article: Twenty-two years after Tony Hawk became the first skateboarder to land a 900 on a vert ramp at the X Games, Gui Khury made history of his own Friday night on Day 3 of the X Games in Vista, California. Khury, 12, became the first to land a 1080 on a vert ramp, winning the gold medal in the Vert Best Trick contest by besting eight others, including Hawk, who was a surprise entry at age 53. Khury became the youngest gold medalist in X Games history. Hawk, a 10-time gold medalist who hadn’t competed in the X Games since 2003, decided less than an hour before the competition that he would enter. The 18-year gap between X Games appearances is the largest in history. A victory in the Vert Best Trick, which is a gold-only event, would have made Hawk the oldest gold medalist in X Games history. USA Today Article: Gui Khury lands 1080 to win X Games gold medal Christian Ortega Competing against his childhood idol, Tony Hawk, Gui Khury dared himself to do something nobody had done before Friday night on Day 3 of the X Games in Vista, California. The 12-year-old dropped down the vert ramp, gained some air and then let physics take over as he rotated 1080 degrees and became the first skater to land the trick on a non-mega ramp. Hawk embraced Khury who was wiping tears from his face.  Khury became the youngest gold medalist in X Games history. He beat eight other...