“With a stunning first run, Chloe Kim wins another gold in the halfpipe.” by John Branch via The New York Times

“With a stunning first run, Chloe Kim wins another gold in the halfpipe.” by John Branch via The New York Times

Chloe Kim’s score from her first halfpipe run delivered her second consecutive gold medal in the event.Gabriela Bhaskar/The New York Times Kim was awarded with an untouchable score of 94. Queralt Castellet, of Spain, earned the silver medal, and Sena Tomita, of Japan, won bronze, neither seriously threatening Kim’s performance. Kim tried to ratchet the degree of difficulty in her final two runs, the way she had four years ago. She fell both times. It didn’t matter. The contest was over nearly as quickly as it had started. “Not to discount any of these riders, but she has a bag of tricks that not anyone else does,” Kim’s longtime coach, Rick Bower, said. “And she showcased that in her first run.”The victory felt less like a coronation for Kim, now 21, but a personal comeback of sorts. The lingering question as she scooted away was what happens next. Four years ago, Kim arrived to the 2018 Olympics and landed into the embrace of a warm South Korean crowd, a loving family and instant stardom. She was 17. It all seemed so easy. The 2022 Olympic halfpipe final had none of that, except in the pipe itself. There was no crowd because of the pandemic. Her family did not attend. And Kim is now 21. This is a different time and a different Kim. Chloe Kim fell on her second and third runs but still remained in first place with a 94.Credit…Gabriela Bhaskar/The New York Times The attention from the last Olympic victory, and some of the nastiness, even within snowboarding circles, nearly chased her from the sport. She didn’t strap...
“A Brief History of Snowboarding – Rebellious youth. Olympic glory. How a goofy American pastime conquered winter” by Max Ufberg via Smithsonian Magazine

“A Brief History of Snowboarding – Rebellious youth. Olympic glory. How a goofy American pastime conquered winter” by Max Ufberg via Smithsonian Magazine

Snowboarder Shannon Dunn competes for Team USA in the 1998 Winter Olympics, where she won the bronze medal in half-pipe. Alexander Hassenstein / Bongarts via Getty Images Long before the term “snowboarding” existed—and at least 80 years before it was an Olympic phenomenon—people were zipping like surfers down snow-covered hills. The first known instance came in 1917, when 13-year-old Vern Wicklund stood on a modified sled that he rode down his parents’ backyard in Cloquet, Minnesota. Wicklund patented the idea nearly two decades later but produced only a handful of models. The sport picked up speed in 1965, when Michigan’s Sherman Poppen created the Snurfer by cross-bracing two skis and adding a string at the front for steering. Poppen sold close to one million units by 1970.  Sherman Poppen created the Snurfer, immediate forerunner to the modern snowboard, in 1965. Courtesy Snurfer LLC But the real breakthrough happened when Dimitrije Milovich, a Cornell University dropout, founded Winterstick, the first modern snowboard company, in 1972. With steel edges, laminated fiberglass and, most crucially, nylon straps for one’s feet, Winterstick’s boards allowed riders to fly through more treacherous topography than its predecessors had.  Snowboarding went mainstream soon thereafter amid a fierce rivalry between Jake Burton Carpenter and Tom Sims. Sims, a New Jersey-raised professional skateboarder more interested in aerial stunts than in speed, founded SIMS Snowboarding in 1976. Carpenter, a race enthusiast from Long Island credited with coining “snowboarding,” created Burton Boards one year later.  “They’re endangering the public and possibly themselves!” As snowboarding grew in popularity, so did its reputation as a pastime for screwballs—a counterculture to skiing’s establishment vibe. In the 1980s, most North American ski...
“Outdoor Retailer Releases Education Schedule and Floor Plan For Snow Show” by Outdoor Retailer via Shop Eat Surf (plus free hotel room scholarship opportunity for BRA Retail Members)

“Outdoor Retailer Releases Education Schedule and Floor Plan For Snow Show” by Outdoor Retailer via Shop Eat Surf (plus free hotel room scholarship opportunity for BRA Retail Members)

SAN JUAN CAPISTRANO, California – Outdoor Retailer Snow Show returns to Denver this month with a full schedule of in-person education and a redesigned floor plan structured around The Resource Center, a new information hub to access industry insight directly from experts. Snow Show runs from January 26-28, 2022, at the Colorado Convention Center, and the education lineup and floor plan are now available to help attendees start planning their schedules. “A wealth of resources and learning opportunities are available at Snow Show,” said Marisa Nicholson, Outdoor Retailer Senior Vice President and Show Director. “The new Resource Center will give attendees direct access to critical data, and every education session and new connection can provide the right insight or inspiration to help elevate business. This time together to learn and build relationships is invaluable, and it paves the way to discover more of what the industry has to offer.” Education at Outdoor Retailer brings together industry leaders and subject matter experts to provide attendees with knowledge that can help their business and the industry thrive. The schedule begins with the Snowsports Industries America (SIA) Industry + Intelligence sessions on Tuesday, January 25, the day prior to the opening of Snow Show. The Industry Breakfast kicks off Day 1 with a keynote on “The Art of Impossible” from bestselling author and peak performance expert Steven Kotler. Outdoor Industry Association’s (OIA) daily lunch sessions will feature important community conversations. And programming throughout Snow Show at The Camp and Trend + Design Center will offer retailers, designers, brands, and all attendees an opportunity to learn more on a variety of topics, including design trends, sustainability and climate...
“Volcom Unveils U.S. Olympic Snowboard Uniforms” by Tiffany Montgomery via Shop Eat Surf

“Volcom Unveils U.S. Olympic Snowboard Uniforms” by Tiffany Montgomery via Shop Eat Surf

Men’s Brighton pullover jacket and the USST Hotlapper pant. Courtesy of Volcom Click on the following link to view additional official uniform photos from Volcom and related words via Shop Eat Surf: Volcom Unveils U.S. Olympic Snowboard Uniforms Be sure to visit the Shop Eat Surf website to view valuable Industry News and Resourceful Articles regularly via this link: Shop Eat Surf If you are not already a BRA Retail Member, you can easily opt in to either Regular (no cost) or Distinguished ($100/yr.) Membership via this super simple join...
“Watch: How a Snowboard is Made at the Never Summer Factory” by Lucky Lopez via Snowboard Mag

“Watch: How a Snowboard is Made at the Never Summer Factory” by Lucky Lopez via Snowboard Mag

You may want to share the following video with your snowboarding customers: Since its inception, Never Summer has made all of their snowboards out of their Denver, Colorado HQ. Attached to the offices and showroom is the factory, which is open to the public for tours during business hours. Mary Lenefsky, assistant marketing director at NS, takes us through the factory and all the stages of making a Never Summer board. If you’ve ever wanted to see the process of how a snowboard is made, you can sign up for a tour by contacting Never Summer via the info on their website. Filmed and edited by Lucky Lopez. Snowboard Mag’s mission is to share the finer things of a lifestyle they call their own, to respect the past and embrace the future. Through storytelling, photos, film, and product, they understand the importance of life in the mountains and in the cities we live. Be sure to bookmark their remarkable website: https://snowboardmag.com/ If you are not yet a BRA Retail Member, you can easily opt in to either Regular (no cost) or Distinguished ($100/yr.) Membership via this super simple join...
“Lake Tahoe Breaks Record for Snowfall in December, Closing Resorts and Roads” by Staff writer via The Inertia

“Lake Tahoe Breaks Record for Snowfall in December, Closing Resorts and Roads” by Staff writer via The Inertia

Yeah, it’s deep. Photo: Palisades Tahoe It’s safe to say that Lake Tahoe, Calif. is off to a good start for winter. Maybe too good. The region smashed its record snow total for December, receiving a recorded 193.7 inches, topping the previous record of 179 set in 1970. And there’s still more on the way before the new year. Climate scientists are lauding the storm as  “very beneficial” to the region that has been hit hard by drought in recent years (quite possibly the understatement of the century). Resorts like Heavenly and Palisades were closed yesterday due to snow being too deep, with delayed openings today as well. “Today we broke a record,” wrote Palisades on its social platforms. “This is our biggest December storm in 50 years, and it delivered road closures and avalanche hazards. We’ve received nearly SEVEN FEET of new snow since Wednesday! It will be deep out there this week. Be sure to ski with a buddy, keep them in sight at all times, and avoid tree wells.” Traffic has also been hectic. Road closures have been rife throughout the region. Caltrans announced just hours ago that Highway 50 was closed. Interstate 80 has also seen numerous closures and delays from snow and downed trees. The freeway is currently closed from Colfax to the Nevada state line. In South Lake Tahoe, resorts like Kirkwood were also having trouble digging out from the record dump. The mountain announced it would try to open limited terrain today as avalanche crews made their way to the summits to control terrain. Palisades Tahoe also announced on its blog that has been tracking the storm, that slides cut off patrol workers...