“Content That Converts” (helpful downloadable report) via Total Retail

“Content That Converts” (helpful downloadable report) via Total Retail

How retailers can grow e-commerce sales in a heightened competitive environment Over the past year, retailers have had to evolve their businesses to account for growing consumer demand for e-commerce. And for many consumers, the shift to online shopping is likely to remain post-pandemic. This provides an opportunity for retailers to capitalize. In order to do so, they must create compelling, differentiated online shopping experiences that stand out from the rest in a crowded digital landscape. This asset provides competitive insights including: How shoppable content can be leveraged to increase online salesTop benefits of incorporating shoppable content into your e-commerce strategyHow personalized shoppable content enhances customer experienceTips on shoppable content production that will drive customer engagement and sales Help your business succeed with shoppable content by downloading this comprehensive guide today. Click on the following link to download this helpful report: https://mytotalretail.tradepub.com/free/w_defa1071/prgm.cgi Offered Free by: Zmags Total Retail is the go-to source for executives looking for the latest news and analysis on the retail industry. Be sure to bookmark this helpful and relevant site:  https://www.mytotalretail.com/  If you are not already a BRA Retail Member, you can easily opt in to either Regular (no cost) or Distinguished ($100/yr.) Membership via this super simple join...
“Shopping on Social Media Seen Hitting $1.2 Trillion by 2025” by Martine Paris via Bloomberg

“Shopping on Social Media Seen Hitting $1.2 Trillion by 2025” by Martine Paris via Bloomberg

Parcels inside a shipping container at the UPS Worldport facility in Louisville, Kentucky.Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg Shopping on social networks such as Facebook, TikTok and WeChat is going to grow three times faster than sales from traditional channels over the next three years, according to a study released by Accenture.  Social commerce, defined as transactions that take place entirely within the context of a social-media platform, will reach $1.2 trillion by 2025, up from $492 billion in 2021, the consulting company said in the report. The trend is being driven primarily by Gen Z and Millennial consumers, who are expected to account for 62% of the spending.  The most popular products sold via social networks include clothing, consumer electronics and home decor. Beauty and personal care is also seeing growth, with online influencers playing a significant role. The trend offers good news for mom-and-pop shops: More than half of so-called social buyers surveyed said they are likely to support small businesses over larger retailers and would likely buy from them again. This may allow new brands to build loyalty and gain traction. Accenture also found that around 3.5 billion people used social media in 2021, spending on average two and a half hours engaged with it per day. The market for social commerce is far less saturated in the U.S. and the U.K. than in China, where 80% of social media users make social-commerce purchases, according to Accenture. China is expected to remain the most advanced market for social commerce in size and maturity, Accenture said, with the highest growth being posted in developing markets such as India and Brazil.  The study is based...
“4 Ways to Manage Your Company’s Online Reputation Without Ads” by Dave Lehman via Total Retail

“4 Ways to Manage Your Company’s Online Reputation Without Ads” by Dave Lehman via Total Retail

Credit: Getty Images by Eva-Katalin As you might expect, advertisements don’t win over customers anymore. Why? Consumers are  annoyed with ads. And so are marketers — 20 percent to 40 percent of clicks on paid ads are fraudulent. For these reasons, online reputation management, the practice of crafting strategies that shape or influence the public perception of an organization, has risen in importance. Recent research shows that 57 percent of marketers prefer to focus on boosting online reputation instead of advertising. It’s clear to see online reputation management is more critical now than ever before. Companies today need to create positive customer experiences to win new business. Rather than throw more money at advertising, consider these four ways to manage your online reputation that will help turn happy customers into revenue: 1. Gather customer reviews. Reviews are necessary for gaining new customers and ensuring the satisfaction of returning ones. When someone visits your store location, encourage them to leave a review and share their thoughts online. Be sure to send requests for reviews within 24 hours of the guest’s visit. Waiting too long to send a request may result in the guest forgetting their experience, meaning they’ll be less likely to leave a review. Related story: 9 Best Practices for Negative Customer Reviews 2. Build a referral program. When your business has a robust online presence, you can focus your attention elsewhere outside of strictly acquiring customers. That’s because happy customers bring in new customers. Incentivizing your guests to refer people to your store(s) will help your business grow faster. Consider offering gift cards, discounts and deals to your returning patrons and new ones. You can also create custom...
“Will 2022 be the Year of the Dark Horse in Retail?” by Arick Wierson via The Robin Report

“Will 2022 be the Year of the Dark Horse in Retail?” by Arick Wierson via The Robin Report

My father grew up on a farm in central Iowa in the 1930s and 40s, and although life in the post-Depression heartland was pretty harsh, among his fondest memories from his childhood are those of his many horses, each one of them different shades of black. As a youngster, he had a black Shetland Pony named “Spanky.” Then in middle school came “Spot,” a black Murgese And in his final years of high school, his father – my grandpa, who by this time was feeling a bit less worried with the worst of the Great Depression more than two decades in the past, splurged and gave my dad a powerful riding horse named “Lucky,” a jet-black Percheron – apparently a ‘big hit’ with ladies in town (OK, whatever you say, dad.) . It is pretty much a given at this point that retailers will eventually have to enable payment and checkout solutions that accept Bitcoin, Ethereum, and Dogecoin. Anyway, decades later when yours truly was growing up in 70s and 80s in the Minneapolis suburbs, apparently my father felt that there was a gaping hole in my psycho-emotional development in that I had very little interaction with farm life, in particular, with horses. And the way in which he attempted to fill this void was with a near-endless menagerie of equine-themed birthday toys, trips to the annual ‘Horse Show” at the Minnesota State Fair and, of course, several trips to the cinema to see the now classic 1979 film “The Black Stallion,” starring Mickey Rooney and Teri Garr. Now, by this point, you are likely asking yourself what all...
“TikTok usage surpassed Instagram this year among kids aged 12 to 17, Forrester survey says” by Salvador Rodriguez via CNBC

“TikTok usage surpassed Instagram this year among kids aged 12 to 17, Forrester survey says” by Salvador Rodriguez via CNBC

Adam Mosseri speaks onstage at the WIRED25 Summit 2019 – Day 1 at Commonwealth Club on November 08, 2019 in San Francisco, California.Matt Winkelmeyer | Getty Images KEY POINTS More Americans between the ages of 12 and 17 are using TikTok than Instagram on a weekly basis, according to survey findings published by Forrester on Thursday.Facebook said last month that it was trying to appeal better to younger users with its services, including Instagram.“We heard from Gen Z youth that they find TikTok to be funnier and more positive versus other social media platforms,” said Mike Proulx, an analyst at Forrester. TikTok usage is spiking among young Americans at the expense of Instagram, according to survey findings published by Forrester. This year, 63% of Americans between the ages of 12 and 17 used TikTok on a weekly basis, compared with 57% for Instagram, Forrester wrote in a blog post on Thursday, citing data from a survey the research firm conducted. In 2020, Instagram led that demographic, with 61% of kids on the platform, while TikTok had 50%. Instagram’s recent struggles have been widely reported of late, starting with a series in the Wall Street Journal, based on internal research from parent company Facebook, now known as Meta, that was released by a whistleblower. In an effort to keep users on the app, Facebook disregarded its own data showing the harmful effects of Instagram, particularly on young girls, the research showed. Facebook announced last month that it would alter its services, including Instagram, to better appeal to consumers between the ages of 18 and 29. At the time, CEO Mark Zuckerberg noted that TikTok in particular had emerged...
“Retailers Must Find a Way to Keep Pace With Emerging Instagram, TikTok Trends” by Adrien Nussenbaum via Total Retail

“Retailers Must Find a Way to Keep Pace With Emerging Instagram, TikTok Trends” by Adrien Nussenbaum via Total Retail

In December 2020, a Scottish mailman named Nathan Evans uploaded a video to TikTok singing a 19th Century sea shanty called “Wellerman.” Within days, his rendition of a more-than-200-year-old song was shared worldwide, leading to countless online collaborations, features on late-night shows, and finally a three-album record contract. I’m a father of two daughters who do a good job of updating me on online sensations, but even I was taken aback by the speed and scope of “ShantyTok,” as the trend was dubbed. The rate at which these trends are emerging, exploding and being monetized is accelerating dramatically. For retailers, this change in pace of play requires an unprecedented emphasis on speed and agility. The increasing speed of retail trends is directly related to the media on which they’re emerging. While previous fads evolved out of longer viral videos, today’s TikTok videos and Instagram reels are comparatively bite-sized. When content creators are challenged to hold their audience’s attention over a span of 15 seconds to 30 seconds, they’re forced to introduce new material on a weekly or even daily basis. Consider these two features on TikTok fashion from Seventeen and People: published less than three months apart, there’s only one item in common between the two lists. If you’re an online retailer, how do you stay afloat in this rapidly changing environment? Or better yet, find a way to profit off of it? Related story: 3 Key Takeaways for Marketplaces in a Post-Pandemic World 1. Keep your finger on the pulse of emerging must-have products. Many retail executives would prefer not to spend their time refreshing Instagram feeds. However, some degree of investment in observation...