“DC Shoes is proud to present, ‘THIS TOO SHALL PASS’, a short documentary about mental health issues in the skateboarding community.” – be sure to share this important video with your customers

“DC Shoes is proud to present, ‘THIS TOO SHALL PASS’, a short documentary about mental health issues in the skateboarding community.” – be sure to share this important video with your customers

Push play to view this important video Everyone you meet is fighting a battle you know nothing about. Be kind. Always. DC Shoes is proud to present, “THIS TOO SHALL PASS”, a short documentary about mental health issues in the skateboarding community. DC team rider, John Gardner, opens up about his own mental health struggles as he experienced suicidal thoughts and depression over the years. John talks about how he uses meditation, breathing and skateboarding to help heal from depression. The documentary also features Andrew Huberman, Professor of Neurobiology and Ophthalmology at Stanford School of Medicine, providing some amazing insight into how we can help ourselves and each other on a daily basis. John also curated a limited zine that includes facts on mental health, self-care, breathing techniques and other tools that can be useful for anyone suffering from depression. Check the link below to read the digital zine and more. Link: https://dcshoes.com/blog/skate/This-T… For anyone battling issues with mental health or having thoughts of suicide, please know that you are not alone. You are loved – and there are resources available to provide support. National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-TALK (8255) www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org Follow DC Shoes: Website: www.dcshoes.com Instagram: @dcshoes TikTok: @dcshoes Facebook: https://facebook.com/DC.Shoes View this important video on Thrasher via the following link: https://www.thrashermagazine.com/articles/trash/dc-shoes-this-too-shall-pass/ JENKEM – John Gardner’s Tips for Building Up Your Mental Health View another important article featuring Andrew Huberman via the following link: https://www.boardretailers.org/discussing-skateboarding-with-neuroscientist-andrew-huberman-by-karl-watson-rob-fraebel-via-jenkem-mag/ If you like fun and intelligent skateboarding related articles, be sure to visit and bookmark: Jenkem Mag If you are not yet a BRA Retail Member, you can easily opt in to either Regular (no...
“Selema Masekela Is Right: Action Sports Still Have a Long Way to Go” by Joe Carberry via The Inertia

“Selema Masekela Is Right: Action Sports Still Have a Long Way to Go” by Joe Carberry via The Inertia

Selema Masekela, the voice. Photo: Jeremy Deputat/Red Bull Content Pool Selema Masekela is a generational voice. Not just because he’s articulate. Because he’s put time in. He started answering phones at Transworld as an intern in the nineties. He announced every beach, skate, and snow event he could as a side hustle, then became the face of the X Games. And he can actually surf and snowboard. Like, really well. Aside from the athletes, there’s no one more respected in the world of action sports than Selema Masekela. Then he branched out, moving into the mainstream realm with ESPN, and E!, the celebrity gossip show we only watched because he was hosting. But talk to Selema for even a minute and it’s clear, at 49, he doesn’t really give a shit about those accolades anymore. Yeah, he’s good at his job. But he’s focused on something bigger. After George Floyd’s murder, Selema’s role in our world took on a whole new meaning. He’s been there to guide us and to remind everyone that yes, racial injustice really does exist in this space. Not everyone has been given the opportunity to take off on a set wave or ride powder. This isn’t new territory for him. He’s been reminding us for years, putting the work in with his Stoked Mentoring program to get more kids of color involved. Last spring, when things came to a boil socially, Selema was there to disseminate the chaos, to inspire change, which started with himself, taking back his birth name, and leading rallies. He’s not done. Not even close. In fact, he’s just getting started. I ran into him recently in Japan...
BRA Book Review of “The Radical Undersea Journey of Mr. Dude by Vipe Desai” by BRA Executive Director Doug Works

BRA Book Review of “The Radical Undersea Journey of Mr. Dude by Vipe Desai” by BRA Executive Director Doug Works

A surfer at heart, Mr. Dude is someone who – like so many of us, unfortunately – never put a whole lot of thought into the ways that his decisions and behaviors affected the environment around him. He used plastic straws, he guzzled one bottled water after another, and he carried things around in plastic bags. A local surf hero, he was content not to know the effect that he was having on the ocean that was so dear to his heart. It was not something that he did out of meanness or malice: rather, he lacked any real intentions. He did what he did thoughtlessly. Introducing: The Radical Undersea Journey of Mr. Dude by Vipe Desai In this book, Mr. Dude is in for an awakening – rude, important, and life-changing. The Radical Undersea Journey of Mr. Dude is a children’s picture book that tells the tale, beginning with the local surf hero’s eco-unfriendly exploits and leading into the momentous day on which he finds himself transformed into a fish. As a fish, Mr. Dude sees firsthand just how tremendous is the destruction he has sewn. A fun and impactful adventure, this is one that I am confident will inspire loving hearts and real action, encouraging the next generation to do what is right for our planet by cultivating a sense of awareness and responsibility with regards to our roles in the world. – Vipe Desai (the Author) A portion of the proceeds from the book will benefit Vote The Ocean! Board Specialty Retail Shops can order books by emailing: donate@votetheocean.org BRA Book Review Recently, I checked my mailbox and found an...
“MY STRUGGLE WITH DEPRESSION AND HOW WE CAN HELP OTHERS” by Eric Brown via Jenkem Mag

“MY STRUGGLE WITH DEPRESSION AND HOW WE CAN HELP OTHERS” by Eric Brown via Jenkem Mag

I had just woken up at 4:00 AM, and while I was waiting for my dog to finish his business, I checked my Instagram and saw a few guys posting photos of Henry Gartland. Later that morning all of his sponsors, friends, and magazine outlets followed suit. While lurking slap I found out that Henry had committed suicide. I was shocked that another young, talented skater took his own life. The next day Instagram stories with the suicide prevention hotline’s number started making the rounds. However, certain pros began to call out their friends and teammates for not being there to help them and for not properly checking on them. That’s the thing though… Does anyone know how to properly help a friend that has depression or anxiety? Do they even know how to tell if they feel that way at all? WHO AM I? My name is Eric Brown. I’m twenty-seven years old and was born in New Mexico but grew up in West Texas in a small college party city known as Lubbock. I attempted suicide two times when I was eighteen years old and survived. I grew up in a somewhat healthy household where I was the youngest of three. I was a typical middle-class kid. I didn’t have too many real-world issues to contend with until my sister got pregnant at a young age, my parents lost their jobs during the recession, and they began fighting. While that was going on at home, I was picked on and bullied a lot at school. Even though I was a good athlete, I was a weirdo. Not like...
“Skateboarding eyes brighter future with USOPC support on mental issues” by Rory Carroll via Reuters

“Skateboarding eyes brighter future with USOPC support on mental issues” by Rory Carroll via Reuters

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) – The skateboarding community, rocked by several prominent deaths related to mental health issues, is hoping the benefits that go with the sport’s inclusion in this year’s Tokyo Olympics will help its athletes tackle the underlying problems.Professional skateboarder Tony Hawk rides his during the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Vista, California, U.S., May 8, 2020. Picture taken May 8, 2020. REUTERS/Mike Blake Briton Ben Raemers died by suicide in 2019, skateboarding pioneer Jeff Grosso passed away after a drug overdose in 2020, and 22-year-old Henry Gartland took his own life last month, highlighting the urgent need to address issues like depression and addiction. “Skateboarding is a very tight-knit community,” said USA Skateboarding CEO Josh Friedberg. “Everyone has these links to each other and that makes losses like these tougher to deal with because there’s so many personal connections. “The good news is that it’s causing people to think more deeply about mental health in skateboarding – trying to figure out new ways to support the people that they love and care about.” Friedberg said one key development is that the athletes now have access to the United States Olympic and Paralympic Committee (USOPC) mental health services for the first time. “We’ve been really lucky to have the support of the USOPC in this situation,” he said. “They have been proactive in providing mental health resource for our team and staff.” Tony Hawk, one of the world’s most famous skateboarders, said that while there has been progress in combating the stigma associated with mental health, more work needs to be done. “I’d like to say...
“LET’S TALK WITH CHRIS NIERATKO ABOUT SKATE SHOP DAY, THE EVOLUTION OF SKATE SHOPS, GIVING BACK TO THE COMMUNITY, THE OLYMPICS AND MORE” by Jordy via Good Day To Skateboards

“LET’S TALK WITH CHRIS NIERATKO ABOUT SKATE SHOP DAY, THE EVOLUTION OF SKATE SHOPS, GIVING BACK TO THE COMMUNITY, THE OLYMPICS AND MORE” by Jordy via Good Day To Skateboards

Chris Nieratko has been a big voice in skateboarding for more than twenty-five years. More recently, him and his friends started Skate Shop Day, which will be held on February 19th this year, for its second edition. We had the chance to talk with him to learn more about it, to discuss the evolution of skate shops, the importance of giving back to the community and more. Grab a drink, some snacks, and enjoy this very interesting interview. How did you come up with the idea of creating the Skate Shop Day in 2020? When did you first think about it? Truth be told, it’s not my idea entirely. My friend Scotty Coats, who works in the music industry, is a lifelong skater, and he was on the ground floor of Record Store Day which has been hugely successful. It’s pretty remarkable because they now have it twice a year, earlier in the year and then I think it’s the Friday after Thanksgiving. Scotty was telling me that these mom-and-pop record stores have a special day, they get exclusive and limited product. And in that day, they generate three to five months’ worth of rent, in one single day. I was blown away by that alone and he’s like, “We should do this for skate shops”. I absolutely fell in love with the idea and so that was last February, we thought of it on a Friday, and the following Thursday we launched a website and Instagram, thanks to artist Sasha Barr for lending us his, “Support your local skateshop” artwork. That first skate shop day I basically went through my cell...