“The Undeniable Influence and Purchasing Power of Gen Z – How TikTok dances and streetwear drops are reshaping retailer strategies” by Adrien Nussenbaum via Total Retail

“The Undeniable Influence and Purchasing Power of Gen Z – How TikTok dances and streetwear drops are reshaping retailer strategies” by Adrien Nussenbaum via Total Retail

Credit: Getty Images by Franek Strzeszewski When we look back on trends from the 2010s, beyond planking and the Harlem Shake, one of the most pervasive fads was a certain type of thinkpiece: Millennials Are Killing Doorbells by Texting Instead. Millennials Are Killing Cereal. Can Boomers and Gen Z Save It? Even paper products couldn’t be spared: Millennials are killing the napkin industry. For years, these murderous, anti-capitalist millennials were lambasted for their role in bringing down some of our most important consumer products. But as millennials begin to age out of the coveted 18–49 shopping demographic, we’re seeing less reference to their role as an economic killer. Instead, Gen Z is coming under scrutiny for their unique consumer behaviors. Like millennials before them, Gen Z has become the subject of a number of opinion pieces in which industry analysts complain about their lack of loyalty and obsession with value. “They don’t want to pay full price for anything,” comments a consultant in this Business Insider piece on Gen Z shopping habits. In the same article, an executive director at Ernst & Young laments, “there really isn’t loyalty like in the past.” Gen Z’s spending power is on the rise. According to a recent Bloomberg report, the young students and professionals now command $360 billion in disposable income. As that figure increases, retailers cannot afford to keep making the same mistake. With each new generation, retailers will have two choices: they can blame them for their new shopping preferences, or they can adapt to the new state of play, making adjustments to their strategy to capture the interest and buying power of each...
“What Happened to Authentic Streetwear?” by Mikelya Fournier via The Robin Report

“What Happened to Authentic Streetwear?” by Mikelya Fournier via The Robin Report

Everywhere you look, you see the same jogger outfits with predictable brand logos on display for the world to see. If you stop and ask the wearer about it, they’ll harp on the fact that they waited for hours in a digital waiting room just to have their chance to purchase it for the insane price of $250. What makes this even more bizarre is that the same jogger set will be available in a few more weeks in a different color. Streetwear Loses Its Luster Consumers are being snowed into believing streetwear is only about exclusivity. They’ve become accustomed to buying into variety rather than voice and vision. I never thought I’d see the day where streetwear was no longer for the streets. The market is now flooded with overpriced branded “merch” disguised behind streetwear’s business model. Or we see luxury collabs that exclude the communities whose DNAs were embedded into the original soul of streetwear. The creative expression that drove society-altering messages within streetwear is slowly dying out. Does Fashion Even Understand Streetwear? Streetwear began as a safe haven for underrepresented communities who didn’t have access to mainstream fashion. Although we give much due credit to trailblazers such as James Jebbie of Supreme and Shawn Stussey of Stüssy for giving streetwear the steam it needed to evolve, we have to remember that streetwear culture reaches back beyond the early 90s. During the birth of hip hop in the late 70s and early 80s, rappers were gaining traction and their lifestyles became the focal point of their fans. Despite having a rapidly growing community, mainstream brands were apprehensive to work with rappers because...
“Virgil Abloh dies at 41” by Daphne Howland via Retail Dive

“Virgil Abloh dies at 41” by Daphne Howland via Retail Dive

Courtesy of LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton Dive Brief: Fashion designer Virgil Abloh, founder of Off-White and artistic director for men’s at Louis Vuitton, died on Sunday. He was 41.Abloh had been undergoing treatment for a rare and aggressive cancer, cardiac angiosarcoma, for more than two years, but didn’t disclose the diagnosis to the public, according to an announcement from Off-White.Abloh wasn’t formally trained in fashion; he had a civil engineering degree from the University of Wisconsin and master’s in architecture from the Illinois Institute of Technology. But he has had a profound influence on today’s fashion and culture, even beyond the streetwear designs he is best known for. Dive Insight: The fashion world didn’t always know what to make of Virgil Abloh or his designs, but that only seemed to fuel his success. While he is best known for his work in apparel, Abloh’s work spanned several disciplines, including music and art; his graduate architecture studies featured curriculum developed by Mies van der Rohe, according to a press release from LVMH. Off-White c/o Virgil Abloh in 2012 began as a work of art dubbed “Pyrex Vision,” and the next year debuted as a branded runway collection during Paris Fashion Week. In 2015 Off-White was a finalist for the LVMH Prize. Earlier this year LVMH acquired a majority stake in the brand; previously Farfetch had acquired it when it took over parent New Guards Group. Abloh’s work with LVMH has been longstanding, and he was appointed men’s artistic director at Louis Vuitton in 2018. “We are all shocked after this terrible news,” LVMH CEO Bernard Arnault said in a statement. “Virgil was not only a genius designer, a visionary, he was also a man...