“What Retailers Need to Understand About the Online Apparel Shopper” by Andrew Custage via Total Retail

“What Retailers Need to Understand About the Online Apparel Shopper” by Andrew Custage via Total Retail

Now over two years into the pandemic, the apparel retail category is steadily recovering following declines in 2020. With consumers returning to in-person workplaces, schools and social activities, the need for new clothes has been met with changes to the retail landscape and, inevitably, the role of digital vs. in-store shopping. A new report from Sense360 by Medallia uncovered emerging differences between online and in-store shoppers. Understanding these distinctions can help retailers win over today’s consumers. Key Findings Apparel’s recovery has been driven primarily by a sustained shift toward digital shopping, with in-store sales still trending below pre-pandemic levels. Though certain pandemic-induced habits have stuck, including consolidated shopping trips to accomplish more in each visit, in-store transaction volumes are still down compared to 2019 levels. However, the data reveals that consumers are buying more in each purchase, which could be a result of pandemic-induced habits. Online shoppers have some demographic differences from in-store shoppers and also have a higher degree of concern about COVID-19. Online visits are especially short, with the majority lasting just under 20 minutes, and almost one in five lasting under 10 minutes. Related story: The Trends and Disruptors E-Commerce Needs to Address Source: Sense360 by Medallia January Apparel Shopper Post-Visit Survey (n=1,501) With shorter online sessions, retailers have a smaller window of opportunity to convert browsers into buyers. They can use the following tactics to act more strategically: Deals: Online shoppers are especially motivated by deals when it comes to choosing a retailer (37 percent for online vs. 22 percent for in-store). Retailers should promote deals both before and during the online shopper’s visit to maximize conversion.Personalization: Retailers stand...
“Dare to FIT” by Renee Bavineau via The Robin Report

“Dare to FIT” by Renee Bavineau via The Robin Report

The fashion industry is now tied for first place in destroying our beloved planet. In 2021, 54 percent of retail bankruptcies were in apparel. And 56 percent of online returns were apparel. In fact, overall return rates are up by 35 percent since 2011. Once merchandise is returned, less than 50 percent is resold at full price. What’s more, 73 percent of returns could be avoided by retailers being more proactive. What kind of business model is this? Missing the Point Many retailers are now focused on creating better returns practices. This is not going to revolutionize retail, but it may revolutionize the customer experience. Retailers don’t really have a choice. Many retailers in desperation to keep their consumers or gain new ones extended the holiday returns window well into February 2022. In some cases, coined as the “return-less refund” they’re not even processing the return, but instead issuing a refund and telling their beloved customer to keep it. But there is something fundamentally off with this policy: Here’s your refund but keep the shirt that doesn’t fit. Really? Who wins? In my opinion, no one, not the consumer, not the brand, not the landfills, and definitely not the bottom line. Many retailers are now focused on creating better returns practices This is not going to revolutionize retail, but it may revolutionize the customer experience. Fit Issues Fit is a problem: the third of 10 reasons for returns is fit, according to Coresight. Many other studies say its #1, and I tend to agree. But really, you have to ask, “Why” is she really returning it? Why aren’t the...
“With a stunning first run, Chloe Kim wins another gold in the halfpipe.” by John Branch via The New York Times

“With a stunning first run, Chloe Kim wins another gold in the halfpipe.” by John Branch via The New York Times

Chloe Kim’s score from her first halfpipe run delivered her second consecutive gold medal in the event.Gabriela Bhaskar/The New York Times Kim was awarded with an untouchable score of 94. Queralt Castellet, of Spain, earned the silver medal, and Sena Tomita, of Japan, won bronze, neither seriously threatening Kim’s performance. Kim tried to ratchet the degree of difficulty in her final two runs, the way she had four years ago. She fell both times. It didn’t matter. The contest was over nearly as quickly as it had started. “Not to discount any of these riders, but she has a bag of tricks that not anyone else does,” Kim’s longtime coach, Rick Bower, said. “And she showcased that in her first run.”The victory felt less like a coronation for Kim, now 21, but a personal comeback of sorts. The lingering question as she scooted away was what happens next. Four years ago, Kim arrived to the 2018 Olympics and landed into the embrace of a warm South Korean crowd, a loving family and instant stardom. She was 17. It all seemed so easy. The 2022 Olympic halfpipe final had none of that, except in the pipe itself. There was no crowd because of the pandemic. Her family did not attend. And Kim is now 21. This is a different time and a different Kim. Chloe Kim fell on her second and third runs but still remained in first place with a 94.Credit…Gabriela Bhaskar/The New York Times The attention from the last Olympic victory, and some of the nastiness, even within snowboarding circles, nearly chased her from the sport. She didn’t strap...
“Keala Kennelly Gives Us Her Reaction to the Women’s Pipe Pro and Talks Equality” by Rebecca Parsons via The Inertia

“Keala Kennelly Gives Us Her Reaction to the Women’s Pipe Pro and Talks Equality” by Rebecca Parsons via The Inertia

Keala Kennelly from her inspiring speech at the WSL’s Big Wave Awards in 2019. Photo: WSL / Sloane Keala Kennelly has been leading the fight for equality in surfing for most of her career. She spent 10 years on the Championship Tour and has become a legend in the big-wave realm. Using that platform, she’s pushed for equal pay for women and the inclusion of more women at more surf events. Although the battle has been an uphill one, Kennelly celebrated a victory this past week when she watched the girls surf at the Banzai Pipeline as part of the Championship Tour for the first time. Here, the Kauai native shares what it was like watching the women charge Pipe, why it took so long for them to be included in the event, and the steps she would still like to see taken to level the gender playing field.  You know Pipe better than most. Can you describe how gnarly of a wave it is? It’s one of the most challenging waves in the world. It’s super heavy, it’s very powerful, it breaks on a shallow reef, it jacks up on the takeoff, and it has very vertical drops with heavy consequences if you don’t make it. And the crowd is one of the heaviest, most aggressive crowds of any surf spot on the planet.  What was it like watching women charge out there? It was amazing, I was so emotional this whole last week just watching the women compete at Pipe. It’s been a dream of mine since even before we filmed Blue Crush, which was about twenty years ago now. I was on...
“We Reviewed The Best Women’s Wetsuits for 2022” by Rebecca Parsons via The Inertia

“We Reviewed The Best Women’s Wetsuits for 2022” by Rebecca Parsons via The Inertia

Interested in staying warm? Look no further. Kelin Victoria Editor’s Note: Welcome to The Inertia. Find out more about us and explore some of our archives here. Wetsuits are both the biggest blessing and curse of surfing. They keep us warm and allow us to surf year round, but they’re pricey and can be a pain to put on and surf in. Luckily, wetsuit technology is constantly improving and the suits keep getting better. In a male-dominated sport however, it can be difficult to find gear specifically tailored to women, but the times they are a-changing, and plenty of awesome wetsuit manufacturers are making wetsuits with women in mind. So, I considered what qualities make a good suit and set out to find the best in the game. Here are seven of my favorites. What are the best women’s wetsuits for surfing? 1. O’Neill Hyperfreak Chest Zip 4/3 ($349.95)2. Roxy 3/2 Syncro Plus Chest Zip ($209.95)3. Cynthia Rowley x Roxy 3/2 Full Suit ($250)4. Patagonia R2 Yulex Front-Zip ($459)5. Billabong 3/2 Salty Dayz ($239.95)6. Billabong 4/3 Salty Dayz ($259.95)7. Kassia Surf Sea Caves 4/3 ($419) For booties, check out our guide to the best booties. Learn more about men’s wetsuits here. Want to avoid getting your ears drilled? Read our earplugs review here . Nothing is more comfortable or stretches better than O’Neill Technobutter. Photo: Jody Marcon What makes a good wetsuit? When it comes to selecting a suit, there are a few things to consider before shelling out your hard earned cash. My criteria when selecting a suit is warmth, durability, comfort/flexibility, and admittedly, style. A good wetsuit is warm. Warmth is the number one most important factor when selecting a suit. If it’s...
“Local Olympian Hosts Women’s Skate Event, Raises Money for Survivors of Domestic Violence” by Katie Lane via NBC

“Local Olympian Hosts Women’s Skate Event, Raises Money for Survivors of Domestic Violence” by Katie Lane via NBC

TOKYO, JAPAN: Amelia Brodka of Poland competes during the Women’s Skateboarding Park Preliminary Heat on day twelve of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games at Ariake Urban Sports Park on August 04, 2021 in Tokyo, Japan. (Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images) La Paloma Theatre is hosting the world premiere of Exposure X, a feature-length skate video highlighting the world’s top female skateboarders Skaters of all ages, it’s time to grab your board, camera and riding tunes. Exposure Skate is showcasing some of the world’s most innovative female-identifying and non-binary skateboarders through friendly competition, all the while raising money for local domestic violence shelters. On Nov. 6, the iconic La Paloma Theatre in Encinitas will host the world premiere of Exposure X, a feature-length skate video featuring top female skateboarders from around the globe. The premiere will serve as part of the group’s annual women’s benefit for the Community Resource Center’s Domestic Violence Shelter. Exposure’s History Exposure Skate was co-founded in 2012 by Polish-American Olympic skateboarder and current Vista resident Amelia Brodka. When Brodka was first learning and developing her skating skills, she stressed how there weren’t many opportunities for women and girls in skateboarding. “It was my dream to be a pro skateboarder, and I saw more and more girls and women skating at a higher level all the time, and I wanted to help support the movement that I was seeing because it wasn’t getting any support from sponsors or event coordinators or anything,” Brodka said. While attending the University of Southern California, Brodka created a documentary that focused on the glaring lack of opportunities for women in skateboarding. Her film, Underexposed:...