SIA Reports Increase in Revenue for Snow Sales

SnowSports Industries America (SIA) reports that lower inventories and less sale items helped retailers of snow-sport equipment and clothing increase sales revenue for the 2009-10 ski season to $2.94 billion from $2.82 billion for the previous season. Top selling goods included helmets, powder skis and backcountry skis. • Accessories had the biggest increase in dollar sales, at 7.4 percent to $1.02 billion, followed by apparel (2.48 percent to $1.1 billion) and equipment (2.13 percent to $799.2 million). • Snow sports specialty equipment — 2009/2010 sales were up 4 percent to $1.8 billion, while unit sales dropped 3 percent. • Online sales — Unit sales increased 1 percent, while dollar sales jumped 9.5 percent to $597 million. Last season, online sales leveled off after three seasons of “hyperactive growth,” the report said, though online snowboard unit sales went up 17 percent and dollar sales increased 20 percent. • Chain stores — Unit sales dropped 40 percent, and dollar sales were basically flat at $563 million. While equipment sales generally were down at such stores, dollar sales of accessories such as hats, helmets and goggles went up 5 percent. (Accessories account for about 40 percent of snow-sport sales at chain stores.) Based in McLean, Va., SIA is a not-for-profit trade group started in 1954 that represents businesses in the snow-sports industry. To learn more about the organization or their report, please visit their website at...

Retailers see turn-around in December

As reported by Leisure Trends Group: November was hot and dry across the United States and the outdoor industry paid. Overall snowsport sales fell 9.9% in dollars while outdoor stores had an up-tic of 1.5%. Chain stores provided a lift for outdoor gaining 15% and increasing 1% in snowsports comparing November 09 to 08. The Internet was up 13% in outdoor and 11% in snow while specialty was hit the hardest in both snow (down 18.8%) and outdoor (down 9%). The percentages are preliminary and may change. October’s frost and snow which fed early-season optimism changed radically when Indian Summer spread across the continent. In addition to the weather, retailers did not know which way to turn to find inventory. Many told us that they had reduced their OTBs by 20% and that the 2009/10 season was one where they might lose a few sales, but they were hoping to protect their margins. They scrambled for fresh inventory in October, but that ended abruptly in November. December, retailers say, has returned to normal and most expect a better than last year holiday season. Long term weather forecasts predict heavy snow and winter weather for the month of December. Last November, the Midwest had snow on the ground, this November it was in the 70s. That difference drove Midwest sales down a full 32% from November 2008. Sales in the Northeast declined 22% and the South fell 20%. Positively, a few early snows in the Rockies and Northwest kept both snow and outdoor specialty retail sales nearly even with last year. But, resort shops across the nation experienced slow sales...

Leisure Trends Group Reporting Outdoor Business Up 15% in October

Snow and cold weather are working their magic and opening the wallets of outdoor and running enthusiasts in the United States. After 11 months of month-over- month decreases in the sale of outdoor equipment, apparel and footwear, retailer sales took a huge hike this October compared to October 2008. Independent specialty stores and chain stores were both up 12% in dollars in October 2009 over 2008 and the Internet climbed 27% based on Point-of-Sale data from over 1,000 retail doors that sell outdoor merchandise gathered by Leisure Trends Group, Boulder. All store sales increased 15% compared to 2008 and up 24% compared to 2007. Sales for the month were $390 million, a record October for the outdoor industry. Specialty running stores out paced the outdoor business growing 18% in October compared to October 2008. “In our experience, when sport and recreation enthusiasts start buying it is the first sign the economy is turning around. It indicates an end of pent-up demand for the 20% of the population that define their lives by running, hiking and getting back to nature,” according to Jim Spring, president of LTG. “The same behavior happened post 9/11 and at the end of the .com debacle in the late nineties. Americans may postpone the purchase of high ticket electronics or automobiles but sooner rather than later they will buy a new parka for winter or new running shoes.” The trigger that motivates the change in buying is often the weather. October was the third coldest in every state, with the exception of Florida, and wettest ever in the 115 year period of record, according to...

SIA REPORTS AUGUST TO OCTOBER SALES INCREASES

SNOW SPORTS BARGAIN HUNTERS DRIVE AUGUST TO OCTOBER SALES INCREASES Snow Sports Market Among the More Resilient During Recession McLean, VA (December 9, 2008) – Snow sports shoppers are willing to spend their money on snow sports equipment, apparel and accessories even when the overall economy is significantly down. August to October snow sports sales of $507 million were up 9% overall bolstered by very strong sales of carryover equipment and gear for juniors. “Snow sports shoppers went out looking for bargains and they were willing to buy when they found them,” said Kelly Davis, Director of Research for SnowSports Industries America (SIA), the not-for-profit industry trade group represents manufacturers and distributors of snow sports products. The market data presented in this report comes from the SIA Retail Audit conducted by the Leisure Trends Group. Each season, Leisure Trends gathers data between August 1 and March 31 from a representative panel of more than 1,200 snow sports retailers who provide sales data directly from their Point of Sale systems. The panel and the method for extrapolating the results out to the entire industry is based on a triennial census of snow sports retailers designed to accurately define the size and structure of the snow sports retail marketplace. August to October 2008 retail sales in the snow sports industry were driven by pre-season clearance sales. Sales of carryover gear accounted for a significant portion of the observed increases in snow sports equipment sales. Sales like the “SkiBonkers” sale in Seattle, which are dominated by leftover inventory from the past season, help consumers find bargains on carryover items. Carryover is officially...